From the North Wind Library: The Silence of God

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He preached during the battle of Stalingrad in 1943, a fight that ended nearly two million stories. Written in the years of struggle and turmoil, German theologian Helmut Thielicke’s sermons grapple with deep questions and subjects. Opening his book, The Silence of God, is like opening a church door, stepping in, and coming away with deeper understanding.

The surprising thing in the biblical message is that it finds in love the opposite of fear and anxiety. There is no terror — one might equally well say anxiety — in love, we are told in I John. The surprising thing is that anxiety is not opposed by fortitude, courage or heroism, as one might expect. These are simply anxiety suppressed, not conquered. The positive force which defeats anxiety is love. What this means can be understood when we have tackled anxiety in what we have tried to see as its final root. That is to say, anxiety is a broken bond and love is the bond restored. Once we know in Christ that the world has a fatherly basis and that we are loved, we lose our anxiety. . . . If I am anxious, and I know Christ, I may rest assured that I am not alone with my anxiety; He has suffered it for me. The believer can also know that Christ is the goal of history. The primitive community knows that this One has not gone forever, but will come again. It thus has a new relationship to the future. This is no longer a mist-covered landscape into which I peer anxiously because of the sinister events which will there befall me. Everything is now different. We do not know what will come. But we know who will come. And if that last hour belongs to us, we do not need to fear the next minute. (8-9)


3 Comments

  1. BONNIE BUCKINGHAM

    I needed all the words about anxiety. “The surprising thing is that anxiety is not opposed by fortitude, courage or heroism, as one might expect. These are simply anxiety suppressed, not conquered. The positive force which defeats anxiety is love.” Wondering how this works out practically. What do you do within your mind and heart if circumstances are hard? Those were hard , hard days when he wrote them and anxiety filled the air. Thanks for this post.

  2. Jody Lee Collins

    “We do not know what will come, but we know Who will come.”
    We don’t believe in a kingdom we cannot see because we’re desperate for the truth–we KNOW the truth–and that is our reality in the middle of this broken and often ugly world.

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