Trouble Go Down: Come Away With Me

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“Come Away With Me” began with Rebecca Reynolds’s beautiful lyrics inspired by the Song of Solomon, and I added the chords and melody. Like the Song of Solomon, “Come Away With Me” is a depiction of God’s love for us, calling us out of our fears into close relationship with him; we’re to “go boldly before the throne of grace…” as Esther was bold. Although men often tend to relate to God a little differently, in our relationship with God every human being is female – the bride of Christ. But I will let Rebecca’s lyrics do the talking here.

I played my 1930s Martin guitars and a banjo on the track and Jeff played piano; we recruited Barry Bales on bass, Tim Crouch on strings, Sierra Hull on mandolin, and John Mock on bodhran. Lisa Forbes did a great job singing the vocal lines at the end.


“Come Away With Me”

Music: Ron Block/Moonlight Canyon Publishing/BMI

Lyrics: Rebecca Reynolds/Wynken Owl/BMI

Rise up, my love and come away with me
Come away
Come away
For the winter cold is past
And the rain is finally gone
While the sleeping world awakens
Come away with me
Come away
You’ve stolen to the shadows
You’ve hidden on the stair,
And so I’ve come to you.
I’ve come to you.

Let me see you in the light,
and hear the music of your voice.
Come away with me,
Come away

CHORUS
I’ve noticed how you tremble
At the thought of me.
I’ve seen the turn of fear in your eyes.
But my love is full and gentle,
As the fragrant summer wind
Come away with me
Come away
Rise up, my love and come away with me

Come away

Come away

For the days have turned to song

And doves have come to sigh

While the bloom is on the vine,

Come away with me
CHORUS
I’ve noticed how you tremble
At the thought of me.
I’ve seen the turn of fear in your eyes.
But my love is full and gentle,
As the fragrant summer wind
Come away with me
Come away

Come away with me

Winner of 147 Grammys (or so), Ron Block is the banjo-ninja portion of Alison Kraus and Union Station. When he’s not laying down a bluegrass-style martial-arts whoopin’ on audiences around the world, he’s taking care of his donkey named “Trash” and keeping himself busy by being one of the most well-read and thoughtful people we know.


2 Comments

  1. Matthew Benefiel

    I just listened to the whole album and it is fantastic! This song is no exception, the music was all well written and Rebecca has a way with words as we all know. Rebecca, I remember you had some misgivings on this song so know and rest assured that it is all the more special because of its yearning. The older we grow the more we long for those everlasting arms to enfold us.

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