Trouble Go Down: Title Track

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The song “Trouble Go Down” began as a clawhammer banjo melody written by Jeff Taylor. We were sitting in my studio going through songs and Jeff said, “Hey, I’ve got this melody I want you to hear. Can I use your banjo?” It was immediately memorable, and sounded like it was written ages ago. We recorded a quick demo and sent it to Rebecca for lyrics. Rebecca sent back this mixture of her Kentucky upbringing and King James English, like a song passed down orally for generations.

“Trouble Go Down” is a fitting title track for the record in these turbulent days of unrest in our world and country. The melody and lyrics speak of deeper and stronger and better things, that we can have an inner refuge and place of rest no matter what is going on externally – we can live and be and act from a place of peace rather than from stress and fear.

Since Jeff’s original conception of this song was with banjo, I played banjo on the track with Jeff’s piano, pump organ, and accordion. I added a 1946 Martin 00-18 and Sierra Hull on mandolin, Mark Fain on bass, and the great Stuart Duncan on fiddle. Suzanne Cox sang vocal above my voice, Jeff sings just below me, and Jay Forbes added his huge bass voice to the mix.


Trouble Go Down

Music: Jeff Taylor/Seek 1st/ASCAP

Lyrics: Rebecca Reynolds/Wynken Owl/BMI

Trouble go down, the Savior calleth
Trouble go lay thee down
Trouble go down, my Jesus calleth
Mercy rain around, round.

Worry go down, the Savior calleth
Worry go lay thee down
Worry go down, my Jesus calleth
Mercy rain around, round

Dare you resign thy burden, Brother
Dare you resign, thy pain?
Dare you recline upon thy Shepherd
Sendeth He the mercy rain.

Dare you resign thy burden, Sister
Dare you resign, thy pain?
Dare you recline upon thy Shepherd
Sendeth He the mercy rain.

Sorrow go down, the Savior calleth
Sorrow go lay thee down
Sorrow go down, my Jesus calleth
Mercy rain around, round.

Repeat Chorus

Profile photo of Ron Block

Winner of 147 Grammys (or so), Ron Block is the banjo-ninja portion of Alison Kraus and Union Station. When he's not laying down a bluegrass-style martial-arts whoopin' on audiences around the world, he's taking care of his donkey named "Trash" and keeping himself busy by being one of the most well-read and thoughtful people we know.


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