D. S. Martin



Kingdom Poets: Robert Siegel

By D. S. Martin

Robert Siegel (1939—2012) is the latest poet to have a volume published in the Poiema Poetry Series. His new book, Within This Tree of Bones, is a career retrospective, which Read More ›

Kingdom Poets: Jukichi Yagi

By D. S. Martin

This poem is beautiful. Thanks, D.S. Martin, for continuing to draw our attention to these stewards of words. The Proprietor Read More ›

Kingdom Poets: C.S. Lewis

By D. S. Martin

“Jack” Lewis (1898-1963) wanted most of all to be known as a poet. Today we know C.S. Lewis as a great literary scholar, for works such as The Allegory of Love and English Read More ›

Kingdom Poets: Alan Paton

By D. S. Martin

Alan Paton (1903–1988) is a South African writer who saw himself as a poet who wrote novels. He is best known for Cry, The Beloved Country (1948). It is the story of a Zulu pastor’s search for his missing son, in a land where racial injustice had become the norm.

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Kingdom Poets: Sydney Lea

By D. S. Martin

Sydney Lea is the author of ten collections of poetry including Pursuit Of A Wound (2001) which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. He has also published a novel, A Place In Mind (1989), and two collections of Read More ›

Who Then Devised the Torment? Love.

By D. S. Martin

T.S. Eliot is the only poet to be both featured in my copy of The Norton Anthology of English Literature, and its American counterpart. He was born in St. Louis in 1888, but moved to London — becoming a Read More ›

Kingdom Poets: Luci Shaw

By D. S. Martin

Luci Shaw is one of the most significant Christian poets of our time. She takes on topics of significance to people of faith, yet refuses to undermine her art with preconceived, didactic ways of thinking, or Read More ›

Kingdom Poets: Charles Kingsley

By D. S. Martin

Charles Kingsley (1819—1875) was an English priest known for such novels as Westward Ho!, for his political essays, for his poetry, and for his collections of sermons. Kingsley was involved in the Christian Read More ›

The Dream of the Rood

By D. S. Martin

The Dream of the Rood (the Cross) is, according to The Norton Anthology of English Literature, “the finest of a rather large number of religious poems in Old English.” It is one of the oldest works of Old English surviving today. Read More ›

Kingdom Poets: Sir John Betjeman

By D. S. Martin

[For a while now I’ve been following a blog called Kingdom Poets, written by a Canadian poet named D.S. Martin, whose writings have appeared in a number of publications including Ruminate, Books & Read More ›