Pete Peterson

Profile photo of Pete Peterson Pete Peterson is the author of the Revolutionary War adventure The Fiddler’s Gun and its sequel Fiddler’s Green. Among the many strange things he’s been in life are the following: U.S Marine air traffic controller, television editor, art teacher and boatwright at the Florida Sheriffs Boys Ranch, and progenitor of the mysterious Budge-Nuzzard. He lives in Nashville with his wife, Jennifer, where he's the Executive Director of the Rabbit Room and Managing Editor of Rabbit Room Press.


Class: How Did We Get the Bible?

By Pete Peterson

Update: Tonight is the final week of our “How Did We Get the Bible” class. Dr. Trafton will discuss how Scripture has been translated and passed down to us over the centuries. Previous attendance isn’t necessary. Email pete@rabbitroom.com if you’d like to come and I’ll send you the address. Read More ›

Rabbit Room Membership 2.1

By Pete Peterson

Last week when we launched the new membership program, we had some technical issues. Those issues have now been resolved, and we’ve also decided to give a free download of the 2016 Hutchmoot Audio Archive to all new members upon sign-up. Keep reading for more information. Read More ›

Poll: Beauty and the Beast

By Pete Peterson

Disney’s live-action remake of one of the most perfect animated films of all time will open tomorrow and I can’t decide if I like that or not. Read More ›

Trailer: Struck

By Pete Peterson

Here’s the book trailer for Russ Ramsey’s Struck. Check out the Rabbit Room review here.

A Writers’ Fellowship

By Pete Peterson

I’m a writer, and that means I spent a lot of years feeling like a kid standing awkwardly at the edge of the playground with a third arm growing out of someplace an arm shouldn’t grow. I tried to hide it most of the time, that arm, but occasionally Read More ›

Hutchmoot 2.0

By Pete Peterson

In 2010, when we were first planning this thing called Hutchmoot, we weren’t sure if anyone would come. But people did come—a lot of people—and Hutchmoot has continued to grow and evolve in ways we couldn’t have imagined. This year, things are taking a leap forward. Read More ›

Audrey Assad: Daughter of a Syrian Refugee

By Pete Peterson

“When we avoid…the suffering of others . . . what we’re really avoiding is the cross. Embracing refugees, welcoming them, is welcoming Jesus, and we’re missing out on the opportunity to do that when we hold them at arm’s length.”

What I Didn’t Hear in Silence

By Pete Peterson

Silence is a masterpiece that I haven’t been able to stop thinking about. I don’t know when I’ve ever seen an adaptation that so well translates the nuance of its source material. But after seeing the film, my wife made a critical observation of the story that I think is worth pointing out. Read More ›

Friday Night at the Movies: Silence

By Pete Peterson

Books like Silence only come around once or twice in a generation. I read it several years ago (my review here), and I haven’t stopped thinking about it since. Martin Scorsese had a similar experience. He read the book in the ’80s, and it’s haunted him for over thirty years. Read More ›

The Syntax and Semantics of Serenity

By Pete Peterson

Serenity (the capstone of Joss Whedon’s Firefly series) is one of my all time favorite movies. It’s part epic western, part epic sci-fi, and all classic Whedon wit. Check out this video that breaks down some of the reasons why it all works so well.

The Syntax and Semantics of Serenity

By Pete Peterson

Serenity (the capstone of Joss Whedon’s Firefly series) is one of my all time favorite movies. It’s part epic western, part epic sci-fi, and all classic Whedon wit. Check out this video that breaks down some of the reasons why it all works so well. Read More ›

Gods & Rabbits: How Watership Down Leads Believers and Writers to Freedom

By Pete Peterson

Richard Adams, author of Watership Down, creator of Fiver and Bigwig and Hazel and an entire rabbit vocabulary, died yesterday at the ripe old age of 96. Earlier this year at Hutchmoot 2016, Jeffrey Overstreet led a session inspired by Watership Down, and in remembrance of Mr. Adams, we’ve pulled the talk out of the archives. Thanks to Jeffrey for letting us post it. Thanks to Richard Adams for the stories.

Read More ›