Favorite Quotes

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  • On a slightly lighter note, one of my favorite modern children’s lit. authors, N. D. Wilson, opens his novel Leepike Ridge with these words:

    “In the history of the world there have been lots of onces and lots of times, and every time has had a once upon it. Most people will tell you that the once upon a time happened in a land far, far away, but it really depends on where you are.”
    – N. D. Wilson

     

    “Logic cannot comprehend love; so much the worse for logic.” – N.T. Wright

    www.matthewgarner.com


    Josh Duncan
    Hutchmate
    @joshua-duncan

    Acquire the Spirit of peace and thousands around you will be saved.–St. Seraphim of Sarov

    On a slightly lighter note, one of my favorite modern children’s lit. authors, N. D. Wilson, opens his novel Leepike Ridge with these words: “In the history of the world there have been lots of onces and lots of times, and every time has had a once upon it. Most people will tell you that the once upon a time happened in a land far, far away, but it really depends on where you are.” – N. D. Wilson

    Ah, you beat me to the N. D. Wilson quote!
    That’s okay, I was gonna hit you with some from Death by Living:

    “Living to live always reaches inevitable and pointless Darwinian burnout – bigger fears, deeper mortal panic.  Live to die.  if you do, inevitable success awaits you.”

    “When faced with unpleasantness (trouble) there are only two ultimate responses (with many variations).  On the one hand, “The Lord gives, the Lord takes away, blessed be the name of the Lord.”  On the other, “Curse God and die.”  Variations on the latter can include whining, moping, self-pity, apathy, or rage.  Variations on the former can include laughter, song, retellings, and an energetic attack of obstacles.
    If God gives you (or makes you) a joke, what are meant to do in response?  (Receive it.  Laugh.)
    If God gives you an obstacle, what are you meant to do in response?  (Receive it.  Climb it.  Then laugh.)
    If God gives you more profound hardship, what are you meant to do in response?  (Receive it.  Climb it.  Then laugh.  Exhibit A: His Son.)”

    “Living is the same thing as dying.  Living well is the same thing as dying for others.”


    Ben
    Hutchmate
    @benjikunz

    Recently I came across this quote from a guy named Heath Lambert:

    “The logic of despair is broken by the miracle of grace.”

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    These are all so wonderful!

    Here’s one from the late Leonard Cohen:

    Ring the bells that can still ring

    Forget your perfect offering

    There’s a crack in everything

    That’s how the light gets in

    @benjikunz, is your quote by Heath Lambert from one of his books? I have yet to read anything he has written, but I have had the opportunity to hear him speak at a couple ACBC conferences (assuming it’s the same Heath Lambert!). I think I should add him to my reading list.


    Ben
    Hutchmate
    @benjikunz

    @benjikunz, is your quote by Heath Lambert from one of his books? I have yet to read anything he has written, but I have had the opportunity to hear him speak at a couple ACBC conferences (assuming it’s the same Heath Lambert!). I think I should add him to my reading list.

    Hey Ashley! This particular quote is from his book Finally Free which is on purity. Haven’t finished the book yet but that specific quote has been on repeat in my head since I first read it. The only other book I know of that he’s written is A Theology of Biblical Counseling which I’m about to start reading. I’m really excited about it!

    You’ve been to a couple ACBC conferences?? Do you happen to know Wayne Mack? I went to my first ACBC conference in Indianapolis this year and I loved it. Heath Lambert was incredible! I have a lot of notes in my phone that were taken from his sermon and I’m still referring back to them. His testimony is amazing too.

    “The small one from Thulcandra is already here,” said a second voice.

    “Look on him, beloved, and love him,” said the first.  “He is indeed but breathing dust and a careless touch would unmake him.  And in his best thoughts there are such things mingled as, if we thought them, our light would perish.  But he is in the body of Maleldil and his sins are forgiven.”

    from Perelandra

    “God never promised us an easy life. He never promised that we wouldn’t suffer, that we wouldn’t feel despair and loneliness and confusion and desperation. What he did promise was that in our suffering we would never be alone. And though we may sometimes make ourselves blind and deaf to his presence he is beside us and around us and within us always. We are never separated from his love. And he promised us something else, the most important promise of all. That there would be surcease. That there would be an end to our pain and our suffering and our loneliness, that we would be with him and know him, and this would be heaven.” ― William Kent Krueger, Ordinary Grace

    “You have to imagine
    a waiting that is not impatient
    because it is timeless”
    – R.S. Thomas (The Echoes Return Slow)

     

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    This one comes from a mystery book, but something about it spoke to me. How often do I have a longing that cannot be fulfilled yet I do not turn to a difference choice.

    “Hungry”, she said, “That’s what it’s like. Inside of me, always.  This … hunger that nothing is able to assuage.  It’s horrible.  It’s why I always feel … well, empty.  I know I can’t keep living this way, but I don’t know how to make the hunger stop.”

    “Perhaps you’re not meant to”, he said, “Perhaps you’re meant to cope with it.  Either that or to come to realize that the hunger and the appeasement are two entirely different things.  They’re unrelated.   One will never quell the other.”

    She considered how much of herself – and the way she’d lived so long – had been tied up with a single unfulfilled desire. She finally said, “This is not who I want to be.”

    He replied, “Then be someone else.”

    (Deborah/Simon in “Believing the Lie” by Elizabeth George

    Imagination does not breed insanity. Exactly what does breed insanity is reason. Poets do not go mad; but chess-players do. Mathematicians go mad, and cashiers; but creative artists very seldom. I am not, as will be seen, in any sense attacking logic: I only say that this danger does lie in logic, not in imagination.

    Poetry is sane because it floats easily in an infinite sea; reason seeks to cross the infinite sea, and so make it finite. The result is mental exhaustion… To accept everything is an exercise, to understand everything a strain. The poet only desires exaltation and expansion, a world to stretch himself in. The poet only asks to get his head into the heavens. It is the logician who seeks to get the heavens into his head. And it is his head that splits.

    GK Chesterton

    Love Up
    Love Down
    Love In
    Love Out

    I just came across this quote from Leighton Ford in his book The Attentive Life:

    The great irony of our wired age of communication is that many of our children are growing up information rich and imagination poor–and so are many adults.

    Love Up
    Love Down
    Love In
    Love Out

    One of my pastors shared this G.K. Chesterton quote on Sunday from Orthodoxy and I loved it:

    “Because children have abounding vitality, because they are in spirit fierce and free, therefore they want things repeated and unchanged. They always say, “Do it again”; and the grown-up person does it again until he is nearly dead. For grown-up people are not strong enough to exult in monotony. But perhaps God is strong enough to exult in monotony. It is possible that God says every morning, “Do it again” to the sun; and every evening, “Do it again” to the moon. It may not be automatic necessity that makes all daisies alike; it may be that God makes every daisy separately, but has never got tired of making them. It may be that He has the eternal appetite of infancy; for we have sinned and grown old, and our Father is younger than we.”

     

    <span style=”color: #1d2129; font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px;”>This ease of access, when misused becomes a curse. When we read more books, look at more pictures, listen to more music, than we can possibly absorb the result of such gluttony is not a cultured mind, but a consuming one; what it reads, looks at, listens to, is immediately forgotten, leaving no more traces behind than yesterday’s newspaper.-WH Auden, in 1968</span>

    Love Up
    Love Down
    Love In
    Love Out

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