Writers: Introductions

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  • @racheldonahue: Thanks for the advice! That’s probably a good idea, making a Facebook page; I think I was just hesitant to make another one on top of my personal one, but I can see how that plus ads would help drive people to my page. And thanks, I’m delighted you enjoyed “Quarters”! 😀 I’ve tweaked that one since its first conception a few years ago and I’m pretty happy with it. (Now if I could just find someplace that would publish it! ^^; )

    @ericheiden: Thanks for the comment on my story and for visiting my website! It’s kind of nice to know I’m making connections with other writers out there. 🙂 I’m afraid (haha puns) that I don’t enjoy horror fiction (I’m super sensitive and it freaks me out too much), but I hope you’ll let us know when your site is up so I can take a look at your writing style!

    “Don’t believe every worried thought you have. Worried thoughts are notoriously inaccurate.” – Renee Jain


    Eric Heiden
    Hutchmate
    @ericheiden

    @riverfox237 My pleasure. Actually, my first upload will be the crime story not the horror story, so if you do want to check out my writing style, you shouldn’t have anything to worry about.

    Oh, by the way, don’t make the mistake I almost made and create more than one facebook profile. That’s against their policy. Instead, convert your profile into a page (facebook has a nice tutorial on how to do that). You can keep using your profile for your personal stuff and your page for your writing career.


    Josh Bishop
    Hutchmate
    @joshbishop

     

    Thanks, @scottjames! I’ll keep you in my prayers. I’m looking forward to your Advent/Christmas book — and I was eyeing Mission Accomplished a couple of weeks ago. Looks great! I’ll have to snag a copy for my family.

    @scottjames Excited to hear that there’s more in the works! Hope the finished product turns out even better than you hoped. 🙂


    scott james
    Hutchmate
    @scottjames

    thanks, @helena and @joshbishop!


    SheilaQ
    Hutchmate
    @sheilaq

    Hello, Everyone. I’ve been a silent participant in the Rabbit Room since its beginning, but this is my first time to speak up. I began to be disciplined in my writing about a year ago and decided that this community is too valuable to pass up.

    My current project began when I decided to write down the stories my Grandma told about her life and family. I have an extensive collection of her old photographs, letters, diaries, school books, and even grocery lists and gas mileage logs to help me navigate the details. As I jumped into the process of drafting the narrative, I made the choice to be accurate where I know the facts, and to be simply truthful in all other matters. The work will ultimately be a work of fiction, but grounded in as much fact as I can find. I have primary source material going back six generations, so I have outlines for an entire series, but we’ll see what happens with the first book. It’s a novel, but intentionally designed so that any chapter could be read in isolation.

    @athenaz317 I sympathize with the resistance to blogging. I don’t blog, don’t have Facebook, twitter, instagram, etc. accounts. Is social media presense a necessary evil of the business? Also, many literary journals want material that is previously unpublished, including blog posts. With that being the case, what does one blog about?

    @sheilaq, welcome! That sounds like an incredible project.

    @sheilaq, my understanding (which is very limited) is that you have to have an audience before most publishers will consider publishing your work, especially books.  They want to know there is a market for the book before they invest in it, and the best way to demonstrate interest in your work is with a large following online.  Additionally, I believe it now falls to the authors to do most of the marketing for their books, so there is a lot of pressure there too.  This is why many authors today are self-publishing their work; the benefits of going with a well-known publisher are decreasing.  I am currently working on two books, and I haven’t decided yet how I will seek publication when they are ready.  It’s all pretty intimidating to me!


    Adam Ruffo
    Hutchmate
    @adamruffo

    Hey rabbit room!

    Just wanted to say hello and am enjoying the site. I am more of a poet and a lyricist than a writer perse, but I used to write as a form of therapy and am in a position now to where I can begin writing again and hopefully with a bit more tact and discipline. But I love discovering what happens when your imagination goes for a walk and you end up just somewheres​.

    Thanks!


    Laure Hittle
    Hutchmate
    @mrs-hittle

    Welcome, @adamruffo!

    Hello, everyone ~ I call myself a”wannabe writer.” but I’m taking an online writing class called “Writing with Grace,” led by Ann Swindell. She gave us permission to call ourselves writers if we are in the class.

    I was in a writers’ group at my church for about a year, but the leader had to step down, so it’s not meeting anymore. I’m looking for another group but haven’t found one yet.

    I don’t have any formal training, except for this class I’m taking now, and a previous Jonathan Rogers class on “writing close to the earth.” And a class that Jennifer Trafton Peterson taught.

    I have a dream of writing a book or blog called _Life Lessons from a Slow Learner_. An inspirational memoir to encourage Christian women with lessons God has taught me in my Christian journey. I have written several vignettes, one of which I was able to show to a published author at a writer’s conference, and she looked at me and said, “You are a devotional writer.” <span style=”font-size: 16px;”>That was so encouraging!</span>

     

    @katewillis ~ You mentioned a website for aspiring writers that you submit short stories to. Is it Noble Novels?


    Kate Willis
    Hutchmate
    @katewillis

    @sharonf, yes it is! 😉


    J. Philip Horne
    Hutchmate
    @jphiliphorne

    Hi everyone. First off, I go by Jay, though I publish under a variant of my full name (J. Philip Horne). I write, so here I am. In fact, I write more and more the older I get. A few years ago it got to the point that I actually started publishing novels. I just had my first audiobook launch this week. Hearing someone read my book out loud was oddly satisfying. Look forward to engaging with other writers and artists.


    Laure Hittle
    Hutchmate
    @mrs-hittle

    @jphiliphorne, welcome! That is so cool, to hear your own book read aloud. Last year i was working with an editor who, along with written comments, made me a few videos, and he started out by reading my first paragraph. It was odd, and wonderful, and i’m glad you got that experience too—with a whole book, even! What sort of stories do you write?


    J. Philip Horne
    Hutchmate
    @jphiliphorne

    @mrs-hittle I probably should have included that info… didn’t want to sound spammy on my first post. I’ve published three upper-middle grade (preteen / early teen) fantasy novels, though I try to write them more as fantasy for all ages. The first (The Lodestone) was written in 2011 more as an exercise in proving to myself I could do it. Number 2 (Joss the Seven) was published in 2016 after several years of working to improve my craft. Number 3 (Guardian Angel) was published in March of this year. GA is the sequel to J7.

    I also dabble in poetry on very rare occasion, and lyrics. More for personal enrichment than anything else. And I deeply desire to have a couple texts I’ve written published as picture books one day.

    The reality is I have very little time to write, so it is always slow going. However, I’m deeply thankful for what time I’ve had. Right now I’m sporadicly working on 3 different WIPs: a third installment as a sequel to Guardian Angel, an adult thriller, and a truly bizarre science fantasy fairy tale early chapter book full of very dark humor and big words that will likely never be read by any parent to a child, but it makes me laugh so I keep coming back to it.

    Attachments:

    Welcome  to the forums, Jay … there’s more than a few of us fantasy authors lurking about, and I’m always glad to find a new one.  Your novels remind me a bit of Wayne Thomas Batson’s CURSE OF THE SPIDER KING series … way cool!

    ( tag: @jphiliphorne )


    Laure Hittle
    Hutchmate
    @mrs-hittle

    @jphiliphorne That all sounds super cool! i confess i am interested in that dark picture book myself, haha! (That sounds like a thing @dougmckelvey might be interested in…) i will have to check out your MG novels for our church library. i’m always in favor of marketing to kids but writing for humans.

    It’s totally cool to tell us what you’re writing, by the way. i know it can feel spammy, and it might be in a more general introductions thread. But this is the writers’ introductions. 😉 So we are all happy to geek out together.


    Eric Heiden
    Hutchmate
    @ericheiden

    @jphiliphorne Welcome to the forums! I just joined earlier this year myself.

    Is the adult thriller you’re working on speculative, or does it have a more realistic setting? So far, what’s been the biggest difference between writing it and writing your other books?


    J. Philip Horne
    Hutchmate
    @jphiliphorne

    Is the adult thriller you’re working on speculative, or does it have a more realistic setting? So far, what’s been the biggest difference between writing it and writing your other books?

    Good question… it’s not speculative, though that has not been the biggest difference. My current novels are set in the real world with fantastical elements (and a second world in the case of the Lodestone), so they’ve had to account for “things as they are” to a degree.

    I was impressed by Stephen King’s advice in On Writing… I don’t remember the exact quote, but it was effectively, “Tell the truth.” In novels meant to be consumed by kids (as my first three are), one has to paint with a limited palette, yet still paint the scene and characters as they are. I therefore reference strong language in some scenes without putting it into the dialog, but it’s there, because that’s the truth. Not truth capital T, but truth, that’s how people actually behave. There’s a drunk father who tries to be violent in one scene that I rewrote countless times to strike the balance. There’s a bit of violence that’s described later via a news program instead of playing it out in real time. That sort of thing. So writing novels for kids that involve real peril had that challenge.

    In the thriller, I’m trying to figure out what my palette is… I’m not used to having access to so much range! I’d actually gotten quite competent at keeping the stories anchored at the young teen level. I’m having to find my way with the language, sexual content, violence, etc. I have a couple firm boundaries (I’m not going to purposefully write anything titillating), but I’m having to work out the rest.

    The other big difference is setting. I kept my kids novels grounded in locations I generally knew. I’m attempting to set the bulk of the thriller in Rome. And my protagonist has a specific skillset (ex-pararescuer). Again, the kids novels were about kids. I know as much as most kids… I don’t know how to give a field transfusion when the veins have collapsed from blood loss. I’ve struck up multiple conversations with trauma nurses, watched videos of people driving through Rome, etc. to prepare.

    Lastly, I’ll add that in all my novels, I let my faith find it’s way onto the pages… magically? I’m not sure what the process is, or if there is even a process at all. I put myself into a character and a situation, and I let the struggle take place at all levels. I’m still curious to see what that will look like in a book for adults.

    Here’s my thriller synopsis with the fake draft cover attached. Cheesy, I know, but having a synopsis of any sort helps me write.

    Michael Grimm, a recent veteran of both the military and marriage, feels lost. He works construction and takes gigs as a rescue nurse, rendering aid to injured people on flights home from abroad. He needs more. He needs to save someone.
    Michael is sent to Rome to accompany an injured woman to Montreal. In Rome, he discovers his patient, Ariana, is riddled with bullet wounds, and Michael realizes she’s in deep with some very bad men. When she reveals the real reason he was brought to Rome, Michael has to decide where his loyalties lie. The answer just may get him killed.

    Jay

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