Gods & Rabbits: How Watership Down Leads Believers and Writers to Freedom

By

Richard Adams, author of Watership Down, creator of Fiver and Bigwig and Hazel and an entire rabbit vocabulary, died yesterday at the ripe old age of 96. Earlier this year at Hutchmoot 2016, Jeffrey Overstreet led a session inspired by Watership Down, and in remembrance of Mr. Adams, we’ve pulled the talk out of the archives. Thanks to Jeffrey for letting us post it. Thanks to Richard Adams for the stories.

Pete Peterson is the author of the Revolutionary War adventure The Fiddler’s Gun and its sequel Fiddler’s Green. Among the many strange things he’s been in life are the following: U.S Marine air traffic controller, television editor, art teacher and boatwright at the Florida Sheriffs Boys Ranch, and progenitor of the mysterious Budge-Nuzzard. He lives in Nashville with his wife, Jennifer, where he's the Executive Director of the Rabbit Room and Managing Editor of Rabbit Room Press.


6 Comments

  1. Teresa B.

    Wow. Excellent. Thank you for allowing us this insight and a beautifully composed glimpse into Hutchmoot, this man’s life, this story, and all Great Story.

  2. Linda Rogers

    @misslinda

    Oh, I want to go to Hutchmoot someday and talk about stories with people who love them and speak this language. When I try to discuss a story I’ve read, I know most people think I’m just talking about a story. I’m not. I’m talking about myself, about you, about what it means to be alive and human, about mysteries that can’t be untangled and truth too plain to be reduced to words. I’m trying to talk about what is REAL and sometimes a story is the only way I know how to do that.

  3. Ashley Lind

    @alind

    Listening to this was such a treat. Thank you! It’s been too long since I read Watership Down and this motivates me to read it again. I think I do remember having some sense that it shared a similar quality with LotR. It seems strange at first that Middle Earth and the rabbit-world of Watership Down could have anything in common, but this piece is very helpful in sorting out just why that is the case.

  4. Ashley Lind

    @alind

    Listening to this was a treat. Thank you! It’s been too long since I read Watership Down and this motivates me to read it again. I think I do remember, though, having a sense that it shared a similar quality with LotR. It seems strange at first that Middle Earth and the rabbit-world of Watership Down could have anything in common, but this helps me to understand why that is the case.

  5. booklearned

    […] says about the novel, there is nothing ‘cute’ about it.  I am posting a link to a lecture piece Overstreet wrote and read at the 2016 Hutchmoot, which I thought was […]

If you have a Rabbit Room account, log in here to comment.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *