Archive: Feb 2020



Hutchmoot US 2020: Tickets On Sale Monday

By The Rabbit Room

On October 8-11, the Rabbit Room will convene Hutchmoot 2020 at Christ Community Church in Franklin, Tennessee. You’re invited to come and enjoy a weekend of live music, delicious food and conversation, and a series of discussions centered on art, faith, and the telling of great stories across a range of mediums.

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A Letter and a Poem

By Shigé Clark

As Valentine’s Day came closing in, Jonathan Rogers sent out the following letter on The Habit Weekly.

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The Habit Podcast: Jen Pollock Michel Waxes Paradoxical

By The Rabbit Room

The Habit Podcast is a series of conversations with writers about writing, hosted by Jonathan Rogers. This week, Jonathan Rogers interviews Jen Pollock Michel, author of Surprised by Paradox: The Promise of “And” in an Either-Or World.

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Our Lent Playlist

By The Rabbit Room

The season of Lent is a forty-day period mirroring Jesus’ forty days of temptation in the wilderness. During this time, participants devote special attention to the ache of incompletion, suffering, and trial in their lives, both collectively and individually. Hemmed in by Ash Wednesday and Maundy Thursday, Lent begins with the dust of mortality and ends with the broken bread of the Last Supper.

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Sing the Wounds

By Sarah J. Hauser

The poet Christian Wiman writes, “Lord, suffer me to sing these wounds by which I am made and marred.”

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Local Show Spotlight: Zach & Maggie

By The Rabbit Room

Our March 3rd Local Show lineup is going to be a party. One big reason for that is the zanily skillful presence of Zach & Maggie, who will be making their Local Show debut. Allow us to introduce them to you.

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Rabbit Room Press Presents: The Door on Half-Bald Hill

By Pete Peterson

Every now and then, a book comes along that rings all your bells, shivers all your timbers, winds your clock, melts your face, shakes your foundations, and smacks you upside the head to remind you that stories are altogether a form of magic—and if that’s true, if stories are magic, Helena Sorensen might as well be Gandalf.

The Door on Half-Bald Hill is just that kind of book. It’s mythic. It’s personal. It’s tender. It’s terrifying. It’s fantastical. It’s historical. It’s pagan. It’s prophetic. It’s meticulously grounded, and yet gloriously transcendent.

What is this book, you ask. Rightly so.

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New BibleProject Video: “Tree of Life”

By The Rabbit Room

It’s no secret that we at the Rabbit Room are huge fans of the BibleProject. Their work, in all its forms—immersive videos, fascinating podcast conversations, the Read Scripture book and app, and so much more—testifies to a remarkable integration of beauty, truth-telling, and infectiously playful wisdom.

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Dancing Through the Fire

By Malcolm Guite

[Editor’s note: In case you didn’t know, Malcolm Guite has an excellent collection of poetry for the seasons of Lent and Easter—one poem for each day, including classics like Dante, contemporaries like Rowan Williams, and the work of Guite himself. The collection is called The Word in the Wilderness, and it makes an excellent companion to the Lenten season. To give you a taste, here’s a poem of Guite’s called “Dancing Through the Fire.”]

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The Habit Podcast: Seth Haines Wakes Up

By The Rabbit Room

The Habit Podcast is a series of conversations with writers about writing, hosted by Jonathan Rogers. This week, Jonathan Rogers interviews Seth Haines, author of The Book of Waking Up: Experiencing the Divine Love That Reorders a Life.

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Neglect in Reverse: A Review of Far Side of the Sea

By Shigé Clark

Eric Peters has a talent for calling to lost and discarded things—as anyone who loves his music can attest. Turns out that gift extends beyond his skill as a songwriter. His photo collection in the recent re-publication of Far Side of the Sea: A Photographic Memory reflects twenty-five years’ worth of wandering and watching for fragments of civilization that the rest of the world has forgotten. Here, he gathers them like cast-off scraps and builds them into something new.

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Pathmaking, Forgetfulness, and the Recovery of Memory

By Drew Miller

Lately, I’ve been thinking a lot about paths, by which I mean the ways that we follow to get from one place to another. The more I reflect on what a path really is, the more I see them everywhere, both in their presence and in their disappearance. At this point, I’m wondering what isn’t a path. But I’m getting ahead of myself.

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