Archive: Mar 2020



All Your Silver: To My Grandmother

By Hannah Hubin

When I was in high school, I carved out a piece of my humanities education to study stained glass windows, old cathedrals of European kingdoms, and the men who made them fine—medieval artists smelling strong of a long day’s labor, Middle Age wet mortar, and musty, dark communion wine. These men made beauty meant to age, with secret dyes that centuries of chemists in white lab coats have not yet learned to redesign that grow bolder and brighter year after year of sun and dust and time—years longer than any artist can survive. The moment those windows were made was the moment they were most decayed, and that is all the artist ever saw, and every generation watched the colors slowly come alive.

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Joy Remains: An Interview with Randall Goodgame

By Drew Miller

“As long as we’re singing, we might as well be smiling, too.” As I interviewed Randall about the new Slugs & Bugs album last week, he spoke that sentence so matter-of-factly that I knew he believed it the way a person believes more with each morning that the sun will rise tomorrow, too. And I wrote it down immediately.

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Introducing (Whatever You Do, Don’t) Ask Doug!

By Doug McKelvey

Dear Ask Doug,

My grandparents are always gushing about some dude on the radio® named “Paul Harvey,” as if I should know who that is. Well, I don’t, and I never have. And when I tell them so they just make little huffing noises through their noses and turn to stare derisively into the middle-distance®.

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Read It Now: The Door on Half-Bald Hill

By Pete Peterson

Nearly four years ago, when Helena Sorensen and I had our first conversations about publishing The Door on Half-Bald Hill, we didn’t have any idea how relevant it would prove to be here in the midst of the COVID-19 quarantine. It’s a tale of an isolated people whose world is on the verge of collapse amid blight and plague, and it’s the journey of a young man who refuses to believe the end is inevitable. Though the emotional and physical landscape of the book is bleak, its destination is bright as the dawn.

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The Habit Podcast: Trillia Newbell Endures

By The Rabbit Room

The Habit Podcast is a series of conversations with writers about writing, hosted by Jonathan Rogers. This week, Jonathan Rogers talks with Trillia Newbell, author of Sacred Endurance: Finding Grace and Strength for a Lasting Faith.

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This Is How the Work Gets Done, Part 2: Midwifing Creativity

By Bailey McGee

I don’t think of myself as artistic. At best, I can say that I created eight beautiful children of varying hues and temperaments. My love of science and research led to my career as a labor and delivery nurse. That’s not to say there isn’t magic and creativity required in my work, but I felt much more at home in a birthing suite than an art studio.

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Love in the Time of COVID-19

By Lanier Ivester

I was supposed to be on a plane to Ireland this morning.

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Half-Bald Hill & New Endings

By Helena Sorensen

As a child, I heard a lot about the end of the world—the mark of the Beast, the demise of America, the million-man army that would spread destruction over the face of the earth. Things were going badly wrong, they said, and soon the sun would be darkened. And being an earnest child, I went about gathering fears and confirmations of doom and storing them away like cankerous fruit.

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Hutchmoot Podcast: Giving As the Angels Give

By The Rabbit Room

We are eager to share with you a wonderful session from Hutchmoot 2019, given by Jennifer Trafton and Kirstin Jeffrey Johnson on the compelling hospitality to be found in George MacDonald’s life and work, his home as well as his books. Both Part 1 with Jennifer Trafton and Part 2 with Kirstin Jeffrey Johnson are now accessible for streaming.

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The Habit Podcast: Lee Camp’s Controversial Orthodoxies

By The Rabbit Room

The Habit Podcast is a series of conversations with writers about writing, hosted by Jonathan Rogers. This week, Jonathan Rogers talks with Lee Camp, author of Scandalous Witness: A Little Political Manifesto for Christians.

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New Project: Earth Has No Sorrow

By Eric Peters

My latest project is, content-wise, somewhat of a departure for me. Or maybe it’s not, depending on how you view my songwriting over the years?

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A Rabbit Room Digital Care Package

By Drew Miller

The deluge of frightful information we wake up to daily—though helpful in navigating a disease-ridden world with wisdom and love—ceases to be helpful when it eclipses everything else in sight. So when the Rabbit Room staff gathered on Monday to ask what it means to do the work before us in such a time as this, the answer took the familiar form of providing content that would contribute to the health of our imaginations, the sustaining of hope, and the de-escalation of anxiety—from our homes to yours.

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