Archive: Jul 2021



5&1, Part 23: The Calls of the Birds

By Mark Meynell

It is only natural that those of an artistic temperament will be drawn to the natural world. Forms of human creativity are almost bound to be captivated by aspects of divine creativity. Consider the landscapes of the Hudson River School (like those of Frederic Church or Thomas Cole); or the profound attention to nature’s exuberance in Vincent van Gogh or kaleidoscopic shifts in light in Claude Monet; or the human realities in the biblical story as captured by Rembrandt or Giotto. Then, when it comes to words, just a couple of minutes in Gerard Manley Hopkins’s company will awaken us to what we’re constantly surrounded by but too often overlook.

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August at North Wind Manor

By The Rabbit Room

With memories of Opening Week fresh in our minds, we’re excited to announce more free events at North Wind Manor throughout the month of August!

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Sad Stories Told for Laughs: Buddy Greene & Jeff Taylor

By The Rabbit Room

This week on The Habit Podcast, Jonathan is joined by Buddy Greene and Jeff Taylor for the eighth installment of his special summer series, “Sad Stories Told for Laughs,” in which writers speak of their public humiliations for your edification and entertainment.

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artists & the pit of despair: John Hendrix, Kyra Hinton, and Jamin Still

By The Rabbit Room

Today we get to share with you the first of a new series of topical discussions around visual art. This category of content has been in mind since the conception of this project and is the main reason behind the name “artists &,” so we’re very excited to share it with you.

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As It Is

By Tim Joyner

[Editor’s note: Hanging above the mantle in North Wind Manor’s library is a starkly beautiful piece of art made by Tim Joyner, in collaboration with the old North Wind Manor. See, this work is comprised of found elements from the Manor as the Rabbit Room staff knew it from before it was restored: fragments and pieces of a history we wanted to preserve. The finished work is called As It Is, and one of the greatest joys of Opening Week was hearing Tim describe how it came to be, from conception to completion. Here is the text that he read to us.]

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Rabbit Trails #31

By Jonny Jimison

Jonny Jimison is back with the thirty-first edition of his beloved comic, Rabbit Trails.

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Sad Stories Told for Laughs: Doug McKelvey

By The Rabbit Room

This week on The Habit Podcast, Jonathan is joined by Doug McKelvey for the seventh installment of his special summer series, “Sad Stories Told for Laughs,” in which writers speak of their public humiliations for your edification and entertainment.

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Unhuman Communion: Tolkien on What Lies Near the Heart of Fairy Stories

By K. J. Pugh

My 11 year-old son desperately wants a dog. It is a frequent topic of conversation with many natural on-ramps. Every dog we pass in the park merits a remark on its size, coloring, or temperament—all in comparison, of course, to what his future dog would be like.

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App Release Day: Every Moment Holy

By The Rabbit Room

For the past year, we’ve been hard at work developing Every Moment Holy as an app for iOS devices, and we’re happy to announce that today that work comes to fruition! Click here to download it now.

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The Resistance: Emile Mosseri

By The Rabbit Room

[Editor’s note: As a companion piece to Jennifer Trafton’s essay this morning on the magic of Mary Poppins, here’s a conversation about the craft of scoring films with Emile Mosseri, known most recently for his work on Minari and The Last Black Man in San Francisco.]

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Born to Fly: Mary Poppins, Bruce Springsteen, and the Spell of Immortality

By Jennifer Trafton

[Editor’s note: Our theme for this last day of North Wind Manor’s Opening Week is film, and this evening we’ll be enjoying a private screening of one of our favorite recent films. Here’s one of the most well-loved pieces from the past few years on the blog that engages with the craft of film: an essay by Jennifer Trafton on the mythologies of Mary Poppins and Bruce Springsteen and what they can teach us about freedom, imagination, and the human longing to reclaim playfulness.]

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Sad Stories Told for Laughs: Jessica Hooten Wilson

By The Rabbit Room

As a companion piece to Helena Sorensen’s reflection on the process of world-building in storytelling, here is another conversation about stories of a different kind: the sixth installment of “Sad Stories Told for Laughs,” a special summer series of Jonathan Rogers’s Habit Podcast in which writers speak of their public humiliations for your edification and entertainment. This week, Jonathan is joined by author and professor Jessica Hooten Wilson.

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