Julie Silander



Fear Not

By Julie Silander

I wrote this post the morning before Christmas Eve. At 10pm that night, my husband had a stroke. Changes in circumstance can’t change what is True. We were, are, and continue to be grateful.

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The Lifegiving Parent: A Review

By Julie Silander

“…And that’s why I never read parenting books anymore.” – Recently spoken by a dear friend and mother of four.

We had been discussing the particular challenges we were facing raising teenagers. My friend is a diligent mom who takes seriously the calling of raising children. Why had she sworn off reading books that promise healthier, well-adjusted and happy children?  I knew the answer without further probing. I felt similarly. After two decades of parenting, I know I should be more ______ (you fill in the blank with your “should be;” patient or demanding, laid-back or scheduled, creative and fun or thoughtful and serious), but at the end of the day, regardless of the books I’ve read and the podcasts I’ve listened to, I’m still stuck with me. Which often feels defeating. Which is why my friend doesn’t read parenting books anymore. She’s tired of feeling defeated.

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Slow Church Reading Group Week 3: Economy

By Julie Silander

Welcome to Week 3 of reading and discussing Slow Church together. Here are a few questions to add to our list. Feel free to choose one or two to answer, or you can pose your own to the group. Read More ›

Slow Church Reading Group Week 2.5

By Julie Silander

Many thanks to those who are taking the time to read and discuss Slow Church with us. Who could have guessed that the timing of our study together would have been so, well, timely. I’m grateful to be a part of this community which takes serious the business of caring well for our fiercely beautiful, but badly broken, world. Read More ›

Slow Church Reading Group Week 2: Ecology

By Julie Silander

A few weeks ago, @Pete posted the following in the Rabbit Room discussion forum:

“… When I look at the news (or Facebook) these days, I’m appalled at society’s increasing inability to disagree without falling into insult or anger or hate (or out of sound logic). Why is the art of understanding another’s point of view so thoroughly eroded? Read More ›

Slow Church Discussion: Week 1.5

By Julie Silander

As we contemplate Slow Church, it seems appropriate that the natives are crying for slower reading. Over the past week, we’ve enjoyed rich conversation in the discussion forum, and folks have been generous with sharing their observations and personal stories. Read More ›

Slow Church Discussion: Week One

By Julie Silander

Welcome to Rabbit Room Book Group. We’re so very glad that you’re here. Before we get started, some housekeeping: Read More ›

The RR Book Group: Slow Church

By Julie Silander

Church, done well, is a glorious mess.

A few years ago, our church community endured a particularly difficult season. A handful of challenging, but unrelated, situations grew in strength and intensity like dark clouds Read More ›

Discussion Week 6 (final): The Rarotongans

By Julie Silander

“At the same time that he lost everything—the very direction of his own steps—he won the thing he’d held so precious he wouldn’t approach it in words.”

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Discussion Week 5: "The Fiery Siringo"

By Julie Silander

Note: If you’re running behind schedule on your reading, no worries. Feel free to comment on prior posts as you catch up. There’s no reason the conversation can’t continue! Read More ›

Discussion Week 4: "The 101"

By Julie Silander

Here follows week 4 of our discussion of Leif Enger’s So Brave, Young, and Handsome.

A cowboy doesn’t ask for much, that’s my observation. A flashy ride, pretty girl, momentary glory – for a day or two, I’m glad to say, Hood Roberts had them all.” – p. 145

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Discussion Week 3: "Jack Waits"

By Julie Silander

There is always a line the scoundrel steps across and becomes a wanted thing. Sometimes the line is theater and robbery and kicking the fellow off the bridge; sometimes it’s simply a signed sheet of paper.

Perhaps it is fitting that my own line was merely the end of a dock. – p. 51

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