Pete Peterson

Pete Peterson is the author of the Revolutionary War adventure The Fiddler’s Gun and its sequel Fiddler’s Green. Among the many strange things he’s been in life are the following: U.S Marine air traffic controller, television editor, art teacher and boatwright at the Florida Sheriffs Boys Ranch, and progenitor of the mysterious Budge-Nuzzard. He lives in Nashville with his wife, Jennifer, where he's the Executive Director of the Rabbit Room and Managing Editor of Rabbit Room Press.


Rabbit Room LIVE

By Pete Peterson

In this crazy new world of social distancing, the Rabbit Room aims to bring people together around what matters, and we aim to do that in whatever way we can. To that end we’re launching the latest in our attempts to bring good things to light. Welcome to Rabbit Room LIVE, your 24/7 source of live content for a troubled world.

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Read It Now: The Door on Half-Bald Hill

By Pete Peterson

Nearly four years ago, when Helena Sorensen and I had our first conversations about publishing The Door on Half-Bald Hill, we didn’t have any idea how relevant it would prove to be here in the midst of the COVID-19 quarantine. It’s a tale of an isolated people whose world is on the verge of collapse amid blight and plague, and it’s the journey of a young man who refuses to believe the end is inevitable. Though the emotional and physical landscape of the book is bleak, its destination is bright as the dawn.

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Upcoming Rabbit Room Events and COVID-19

By Pete Peterson

Howdy, folks. As everyone knows, the world has gotten a bit more complicated in the last few days. Thankfully, the COVID-19 pandemic doesn’t affect much in the way of the Rabbit Room’s day-to-day operations. But as some of you know, we’re scheduled to participate in several homeschool conventions and a Local Show in the next few weeks.

After much thought and prayer, this is what we’ve decided to do in light of these upcoming events:

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Rabbit Room Press Presents: The Door on Half-Bald Hill

By Pete Peterson

Every now and then, a book comes along that rings all your bells, shivers all your timbers, winds your clock, melts your face, shakes your foundations, and smacks you upside the head to remind you that stories are altogether a form of magic—and if that’s true, if stories are magic, Helena Sorensen might as well be Gandalf.

The Door on Half-Bald Hill is just that kind of book. It’s mythic. It’s personal. It’s tender. It’s terrifying. It’s fantastical. It’s historical. It’s pagan. It’s prophetic. It’s meticulously grounded, and yet gloriously transcendent.

What is this book, you ask. Rightly so.

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Fin’s Revolution Bonus Episode: Behind the Book (Part II)

By Pete Peterson

Why am I writing about orphans? What’s with all the violence? Have I ever been attacked by pirates? Why did I kill your favorite character? How much of this history business is actually true?

Here at the end of Part II of The Fiddler’s Gun, I sat down with poet, writer, Rabbit Room staff member, and reader of fine books Shigé Clark to discuss some “behind the scenes”-type stuff. Shigé only recently read the book for the first time and came to the studio full of great questions. It’s a fun discussion. I hope you enjoy it as much as we did.

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Why Black Friday?

By Pete Peterson

It’s become a yearly tradition for the Rabbit Room to join in the Black Friday madness, and I’ll be honest: there’s always a part of me that’s uncomfortable with it. Especially since we became a non-profit organization, I feel a degree of disparity when we jump wholeheartedly into something that seems so commercial.

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UK Gift Exchange

By Pete Peterson

Sadly, the folks in Europe always get left out of the Gift Exchange due to the complexities and costs of overseas shipping. But this year they’ve had enough and they’ve taken matters into their own hands.

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Release Day: Adorning the Dark

By Pete Peterson

For more than twenty years now, my brother, Andrew Peterson, has been baring his soul in his music, and in doing so he’s shined a light into the dark corners of the souls of others, mine included. But he’s no ordinary singer-songwriter, he’s a novelist as well, and his Wingfeather books are beloved far and wide; they’ve lighted up untold numbers of faces and hearts of their own, and in their own ways. But today marks the release of something different. 

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Convene the Hutchmoot: 2019

By Pete Peterson

It seems unreal that this is the tenth Hutchmoot (eleventh if you count HM UK!), but here we are. Some days it feels like things are a well-oiled machine and we know what we’re doing. Other days it feels like the first year and we’re sure we don’t have a clue. But if there’s one thing that’s constant, it’s this: we still can’t believe we get to have this much fun. And here’s what I mean:

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The Hiding Place, Production Diary: Part 3

By Pete Peterson

For those who aren’t familiar with Corrie ten Boom and her story, she and her family were watchmakers outside of Amsterdam. When Nazi Germany invaded, they spent two years hiding Jewish refugees in their home (saving some 800 people) until they were caught in 1944 and sent to various prisons and some, ultimately, to Ravensbrück concentration camp. After the war, Corrie would go on to travel the world and testify about her experience for the rest of her life.

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New from Rabbit Room Press: The Light Princess

By Pete Peterson

Since the earliest days of Rabbit Room Press, one of our dreams has been to issue beautiful editions of books by authors we love. And right at the top of that list of authors has always been George MacDonald.

C. S. Lewis said of his first encounter with MacDonald’s writing: “That night my imagination was, in a certain sense, baptized.” And Lewis would go on to read, reference, and credit MacDonald for the rest of his life. He considered him in some sense his mentor.

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The Hiding Place, Production Diary: Part 2

By Pete Peterson

Our first stop in Germany was to visit my brother- and sister-in-law in the small, industrial town of Hagen. We drove, we got lost, we got found, we ate, we visited, and then the next day we went to Cologne to see the famous cathedral there.

The black facade of the church is the largest in the world, and the building took a staggering eight hundred years to complete. This means that for nearly a millennium, architects and engineers and masons and laborers spent their lives in service of a final work they knew they would not live to see.

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