Pete Peterson

Pete Peterson is the author of the Revolutionary War adventure The Fiddler’s Gun and its sequel Fiddler’s Green. Among the many strange things he’s been in life are the following: U.S Marine air traffic controller, television editor, art teacher and boatwright at the Florida Sheriffs Boys Ranch, and progenitor of the mysterious Budge-Nuzzard. He lives in Nashville with his wife, Jennifer, where he's the Executive Director of the Rabbit Room and Managing Editor of Rabbit Room Press.


2017 Trailer: The Battle of Franklin

By Pete Peterson

Writing The Battle of Franklin and watching it come to life on stage was one of the highlights of 2016. Director Matt Logan, songwriter Patrick Thomas, and an amazing cast of Nashville’s best talent breathed life into the story in ways that took my breath away and made it even better than I imagined. Read More ›

Returning to the Stage: The Battle of Franklin

By Pete Peterson

Writing The Battle of Franklin and watching it come to life on stage was one of the highlights of 2016. Director Matt Logan, songwriter Patrick Thomas, and an amazing cast of Nashville’s best talent breathed life into the story in ways that took my breath away and made it even better than I imagined. Read More ›

A Few Thoughts on Hutchmoot Sponsorship

By Pete Peterson

A couple of days ago, we announced that we were actively seeking sponsors for Hutchmoot 2017, and while this isn’t anything new, it took some folks by surprise and sparked a few worries about Read More ›

Every Moment Holy: Illustrating the Sacred in the Mundane

By Pete Peterson

When we invited Ned Bustard to illustrate Every Moment Holy, we asked him to embrace the look of medieval woodcuts with all their symbols and iconic imagery. But because the book is about Read More ›

Every Moment Holy: A Liturgy for Writers of Fiction

By Pete Peterson

Every Moment Holy is scheduled to print in just a few weeks. This past weekend at the Rabbit Room Writers Fellowship, we read through one of the liturgies to close our meeting. I thought I’d share it Read More ›

Special Delivery: The Angel Knew Papa and the Dog

By Pete Peterson

In a very real way, your membership is what makes the Rabbit Room possible. You responded in a big way to our Every Moment Holy campaign during May, and this month we’re saying thank you by sending each of our members a signed copy of Doug McKelvey’s The Angel Knew Papa and the Dog Read More ›

Crooked: My Hiphop Odyssey

By Pete Peterson

In the last few years I’ve had an increasing fascination with hiphop music. (Yes. You read that right.) I suppose it started when I was working with teenagers and one of them was a fan of Read More ›

July 8th: Rabbit Room Writers’ Fellowship

By Pete Peterson

If you’re a writer and would like a chance to get to know some of your fellow writers, you’re welcome to join us next Saturday afternoon. The Rabbit Room Writers’ Fellowship will meet at North Wind Manor on July 8th @ 2pm. Read More ›

Thanks to U2 for the Moth-Force

By Pete Peterson

Last weekend I got to see U2’s Joshua Tree anniversary tour, which was epic and amazing, but it wasn’t the only incredible thing I saw that day. As we waited for the show to begin, Read More ›

Every Moment Holy is Funded: THANK YOU!

By Pete Peterson

By last night when our donation-matching ended, hundreds of you helped raise the funds needed to get Every Moment Holy on its feet. We actually crossed the finish line several days early, and ended up with about 140% of our $23,500 goal. Thank you! What happens now? Read More ›

A Liturgy Before Consuming Media

By Pete Peterson

A couple of days ago, we introduced you to Ned Bustard, the illustrator for Every Moment Holy. We gave you an early look at his work, and here’s a peek at the liturgy that goes along with that image. Read More ›

Interview: Ned Bustard – Illustrator for Every Moment Holy

By Pete Peterson

Since the conception of the Every Moment Holy project, we’ve always known it would be illustrated. We wanted to find a way to capture the style and look of sacred images but infuse them with “ordinary” scenes and subjects. Read More ›