Books



Jack and his Brother: A Review of Finding Narnia

By Carolyn Leiloglou

If you’re reading this, I think it’s safe to assume you love C. S. Lewis and are familiar with at least some of his work, if not his life. Perhaps you are also an artist of some kind, and you long for that Inkling-like fellowship with other artists that Lewis and Tolkien seemed to have enjoyed and that many of us find at Hutchmoot. But what we don’t often consider is that one of Lewis’s primary relationships was not with another artist but with his very practically-minded brother.

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Fin’s Revolution Bonus Episode: Behind the Book (Part II)

By Pete Peterson

Why am I writing about orphans? What’s with all the violence? Have I ever been attacked by pirates? Why did I kill your favorite character? How much of this history business is actually true?

Here at the end of Part II of The Fiddler’s Gun, I sat down with poet, writer, Rabbit Room staff member, and reader of fine books Shigé Clark to discuss some “behind the scenes”-type stuff. Shigé only recently read the book for the first time and came to the studio full of great questions. It’s a fun discussion. I hope you enjoy it as much as we did.

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Stuff We Liked in 2019

By The Rabbit Room

One of our favorite year’s-end traditions is to look back to all the great books, music, films, and television shows that we were fortunate enough to encounter throughout the last twelve months. And as far as well-crafted art and entertainment goes, 2019 was not bad at all. So, without further ado, here is an avalanche of recommendations (plus commentary!) from many of our contributors, recounting all their favorite stuff from 2019. Enjoy, and we hope it leads you to discover a new favorite gem of your own.

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Lifting the Burden: A Review of Choosing Love

By Kelly Keller

In the waning light of most autumn afternoons, you can find my daughter walking a slackline in our backyard. The really uncreative among us call slacklines tightropes, I think—it serves the same basic purpose. The line is drawn tight between two trees and is suspended about two feet above the ground.

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Of Mice and Magic: In Praise of Animal Stories

By Maria Bonvissuto

For the past twenty years or so, Pip Squeak the mouse has held a spell over me.

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A Matter of the Will: An Excerpt from Adorning the Dark

By Andrew Peterson

A few years ago I had lunch with a friend in Chattanooga. His name is Chris Slaten, and he’s an excellent songwriter, performing under the name Son of Laughter. I’m envious of his beard. I asked him how his songwriting was going, and since he’s a schoolteacher I wondered where and when he wrote. Did he have an office? He smiled between bites of tortilla chips and tapped his temple. “I do it up here,” he said.

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Celebrating Release Day: The Light Princess

By The Rabbit Room

With great pleasure, we share today a new Rabbit Room Press reprinting of The Light Princess by George MacDonald. The influence of George MacDonald’s imagination is sweeping and inestimable. His approach to the fairy tale, ever-enchanted by the beauty of the gospel, continues to leave an indelible impact on generations of writers and readers—including us, of course!

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Gobsmacked: An Afterword to The Light Princess

By Andrew Peterson

Years ago I was helping out in a Sunday School class, and the teacher asked the boys and girls what I thought was an unfortunate question.

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A Review of The Dragon Lord Saga: Martin & Marco

By Ned Bustard

At Hutchmoot this year I was able to sit down for lunch with Jonny Jimison, the creator of The Dragon Lord Saga: Martin & Marco—the new, full-color edition from Rabbit Room Press. We didn’t discuss his new book, because he was busy teaching Douglas McKelvey how to play the card game that is a spin off from the book. That was fine, because I had already told him what I hated about his book—it was “Volume 1.”

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Scared and Sacred: An Excerpt from Adorning the Dark

By Andrew Peterson

Being a writer doesn’t just mean writing. It means finishing. I’ve heard it said that a song is never finished, only abandoned. That’s not true for me. To the contrary, I can’t wait to be done with the thing, because only once it’s finished can I raise my hand at the back of the class and say something that will be considered, not ignored, something that might be a blessing to someone. Only then do I begin to take on some flesh and stop haunting the room. Walt Wangerin Jr. said once that art isn’t art until it’s experienced by another.

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The Power of Story: A Review of Slugs & Bugs Books

By Carolyn Leiloglou

Our family has long enjoyed Randall Goodgame’s Slugs & Bugs albums, and even though my older kids have outgrown asking for them, you might still overhear my 14-year old singing “Tractor Tractor” on occasion. What makes those albums so appealing is Goodgame’s ability to draw kids in with his just-right balance of silliness and sincerity, laughter and lesson.

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Release Day: Adorning the Dark

By Pete Peterson

For more than twenty years now, my brother, Andrew Peterson, has been baring his soul in his music, and in doing so he’s shined a light into the dark corners of the souls of others, mine included. But he’s no ordinary singer-songwriter, he’s a novelist as well, and his Wingfeather books are beloved far and wide; they’ve lighted up untold numbers of faces and hearts of their own, and in their own ways. But today marks the release of something different. 

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