Faith



Introducing The Artist’s Creed

By Drew Miller

We are so pleased to share with you a brand new podcast series led by Dr. Steve Guthrie, board member at the Rabbit Room and professor of Religion & the Arts at Belmont University. In a series of interviews with various artists in our community, Steve draws on the tenets of the Nicene Creed to develop a rich vision of the relationship between the voice of God and the voice of the artist—constructing an “artist’s creed” of sorts.

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Addressing The Inner Ring

By Shigé Clark

The longing for community is a deep and personal one. Each of us comes to the subject bearing the burden of our own experiences and the weight of our own wounds. If there’s a way to encapsulate all that complexity with tact, grace, and truth, I’d love to find it, but for now, I’d simply like to have a conversation.

So, let’s talk about “the Inner Ring.”

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33 Poems for Lent: III, IV

By The Rabbit Room

For Lent this season, our friend Andrew Roycroft (pastor and poet from Northern Ireland) has adopted the medieval practice of writing thirty-three poems, each thirty-three words long—one word for each year of Jesus’ life. Together, they form a constellation of commentary on the Gospel of John. To begin Lent last week, we shared with you the first two. Each week until Easter we will share more—here are poems III and IV.

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Desert and Flood

By Candace Bright

She opened up about her suffering and we drew our collective breath. A dozen voices hummed musically when she confessed that perhaps she had been blind. She had poured herself into an effort for years, only to miss problems that had scorched the ground she had cultivated. Handing it off to others in a turbulent ending to her season of investment, she now grieved what had been lost. Time. Opportunity. The struggle to bring forth good only to find herself in a desert partly of her own making.

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First Annual Seed Sightings: A Glimpse of Things to Come

By Gina Sutphin

How many of you have specific events that are a yearly marker in the journey towards spring? I have several. My computer currently has a browser open counting down the days, hours, minutes, and seconds until the First Day of Spring. The start of Daylight Savings is marked on my calendar with a picture of the sun, flowers, and butterflies. But the earliest—and always completely unplanned—marker of spring’s coming is the First Annual Seed Sighting.

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33 Poems for Lent: I, II

By The Rabbit Room

On Christmas Day last year, a pastor and poet from Northern Ireland named Andrew Roycroft contributed a beautiful poem to this blog. For Lent this season, he has adopted the medieval practice of writing thirty-three poems, each thirty-three words long—one word for each year of Jesus’ life. Together, they form a constellation of commentary on the Gospel of John. We are so excited to share these poems with you each week, a few at a time, as a way of walking through Lent together.

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The Voice of Community: Christopher Williams on We Will Remember

By Drew Miller

Shortly after having completed his newest record Gather, at a time when his creative energy was depleted, Christopher Williams was asked by his friend Jaco Hamman to make another album to accompany his latest book. Jaco’s book, The Millennial Narrative, enters into a conversation about the distinct experience of the millennial generation by way of the commonly overlooked book of Joel—he wanted a corporate worship album to bring it to life.

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Our Lent Playlist on Spotify

By Drew Miller

The season of Lent is a forty-day period mirroring Jesus’ forty days of temptation in the wilderness. During this time, participants devote special attention to the ache of incompletion, suffering, and trial in their lives, both collectively and individually. Hemmed in by Ash Wednesday and Maundy Thursday, Lent begins with the dust of mortality and ends with the broken bread of the Last Supper.

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When Dreams Wake Up Different

By Jennifer Hildebrand

When I was a kid, practically every story that danced across the screen hinged on a character who was running down a dream. A big dream. I just ate that stuff up, because I was completely certain that dreams had to be these colossal, magnificent feats worthy of being chased down, maybe even worth dying for. And planted deep in my young heart, I was already tending one of my own.

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Lent with the Desert Fathers

By Thomas McKenzie

As part of Lent, my congregation always studies a particular topic that touches on Lenten themes, such as suffering, spiritual disciplines, and repentance. And as the pastor, I can present to the parish whatever I think is best, so if I’m smart, I’ll teach on something I already know a lot about—less preparation makes life easier. But last year, I did something stupid: I told everyone I would teach on the Desert Fathers. 

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How To Grow Good Wool

By Suzanne Tietjen

I used to be a shepherd, keeping natural-colored sheep for their fleeces. Most sheep grow white or off-white wool, but ours, bred from the occasional black sheep any commercial shepherd would reject, grew amazing-colored wool: ebony, silvers, grizzled grays, and countless shades of chocolate.

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Mr. Brunson’s Offering

By Adam Whipple

One of the difficulties I have with the Scriptures is my inability to see where the jokes are hidden. Jokes are cultural, and I’m neither Jewish nor several thousand years old, so even if the context is explained to me, I’m still sort of in the dark. After all, nothing makes a good joke die of ennui like having some fusty-lipped academic tell you why you ought to chuckle.

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