Faith



An Apologetic for Storytelling

By Ben Palpant

I’ve always been a storyteller. My poor mother! I used to recount every life event in technicolor for her, even movies. She didn’t have to see the movies herself; her son had already reenacted them in their entirety. I think I told stories to know that I wasn’t alone. I wanted to see if the story made others feel the way that it made me feel. I wanted to see if it moved them and transformed them, too.

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The Molehill Podcast: Feelings Like Water (feat. Helena Sorensen & Adam Whipple)

By The Rabbit Room

Wherein Adam Whipple reads his poems “The Knowing is in Silence” and “Swimming at Meads,” Helena Sorensen reads her piece Feelings Like Water, and Drew Miller shares the third Word of Befuddlement: obloot.

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Hutchmoot: Homebound Reading & Listening Collection

By The Rabbit Room

Chris Thiessen (Keeper of the Books, Rabbit Room Store Expert, and Encyclopedic Source of all Musical Knowledge) has compiled a reading list and a streaming playlist that together represent the speakers, subjects, and artists involved in Hutchmoot: Homebound. They are vast. We’ve also got some fun goodies to share from Growley Leather, so be sure to scroll to the bottom.

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Why You Really Ought to Learn about Mongolian Throat Singing

By Mark Meynell

Those ancient Greeks didn’t mince their words. If you weren’t Greek, you were lumped together, not with the lumpenproletariat as Marx & Engels had it, but with the rest of the world, the vast hordes of the ignorant and uncivilised unwashed. They had a single, lump-all word for the lot of them: hoi barbaroi (βάρβαροι). Its etymological roots are assumed to derive from the apparent gibberish uttered by ‘Johnny Foreigner’ (as a previous generation of Brits might have put it). “Bar-bar-bar-bar”—it’s all a bunch of codswallop. No wonder they’re all barbarians when they talk like that.

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The Song that was Sharper than Sting

By Bethany J. Melton

Samwise had climbed too many stairs with Shagrat drooling on his heels. He’d blasted through Cirith Ungol’s gates with Galadriel’s light. He’d searched every black corner for Frodo, and now, his master was a tower trapdoor out of reach.

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Hutchmoot: Homebound Schedule of Events

By The Rabbit Room

Whether you’ve already bought your ticket and want to see all you have to look forward to, or you’re on the fence and want to know more before you commit, here is how we’ll be spending our weekend on October 9th-11th.

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Realism of Presentation, Realism of Content

By Jonathan Rogers

In An Experiment in Criticism, C. S. Lewis puts a finger on one of the things I love so much about Tolkien, though Lewis is not specifically talking about his good friend Tolkien’s stories. In the chapter “On Realisms,” Lewis distinguishes between what he calls “realism of presentation” and “realism of content.” Realism of presentation refers to those little concrete details that give the world of a story the textures that make it feel like the world God made. Realism of presentation, writes Lewis, “is the art of bringing something close to us, making it palpable and vivid, by sharply observed or sharply imagined detail.”

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The Molehill Podcast: Welcome to the Wilderness (feat. Don Chaffer & Rebecca Reynolds)

By The Rabbit Room

Wherein Rebecca Reynolds kicks off the show with her poem “Welcome,” Don Chaffer reads The Wilderness Journal, and Drew Miller shares the first ever Word of Befuddlement: pleethe.

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Clinging to the True Story

By Katie Butler

Her head slouched to one side on the pillow, and her breath rattled through a slackened jaw. As I watched from the doorway, my hands plunged into the pockets of my white coat to hide their worrying, I wondered how many great-grandbabies she’d spoiled, how many Italian treats she sneaked into their sticky hands between stirs of marinara bubbling on her stove. I wondered about the people she’d loved and lost, the memories she cherished. And my stomach twisted as her daughter, whom the coronavirus had stranded hundreds of miles away, whispered goodbye over Zoom.

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Ecce Homo (“Behold the Man”)

By Joel Briggs

Life is scary. It feels unpredictable and cruel. It feels senseless and random. Faith is exhausting. The journey often feels like finding yourself tied up, alone in an unmanned and oarless row boat being mercilessly tossed about in the waves of an angry ocean.

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A Grace Triptych

By Andrew Roycroft

The experience of lockdown that gripped much of the world during the Covid–19 crisis was, for me, a strange period in creative terms. New ministry and family pressures brought on by the existence of the virus meant that much of the mental space I rely on for reading and reflection was gone. In the earliest days of isolating and “social distancing” I felt like I had undergone a power cut in terms of writing.

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Let Justice Roll Down Book Group: Week 4

By The Rabbit Room

Our reading group for Let Justice Roll Down by John Perkins, led by Dr. Steve Guthrie, is in its final week. All materials for Week 4 are now available, including discussion questions, videos, and articles for further reading. Enrollment is ongoing, so join whenever you like.

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