Faith



North Wind Manor: Update

By The Rabbit Room

The renovation of North Wind Manor is nearly complete! The fireplace from Tolkien’s Oxford house is up and ready, just waiting for a fire to bring it to life and books to surround it with good company.

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Taper of Grief

By Amy Baik Lee

Outside, coursing in from the west, the amber and violet gloaming has begun.

Dinner is over, and I sit at the piano. Behind me a stream of girlish laughter twirls and dashes through the living room in response to the film music I’m playing, but my own shoulders are weighted, as if a hollow has been carved between them, and lead poured in.

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New Speakers & Performers Announced for Hutchmoot: Homebound

By The Rabbit Room

One of our favorite parts of Hutchmoot each year is gathering together a plethora of voices to contribute to the ongoing conversation around music, story, and art. This year we’re excited both to welcome back familiar voices and welcome in some new ones. Here’s an updated list of speakers and performers who will be leading us in our time together.

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New Reading Group: Let Justice Roll Down by John Perkins

By The Rabbit Room

Now open for enrollment, Belmont University Professor Steve Guthrie leads a reading group for John M. Perkins’ powerful book Let Justice Roll Down. Students will join one another in reading and discussion.

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To Sit with an Onion

By Elizabeth Harwell

Yesterday, the heaviness of a world under a global pandemic became an almost unbearable weight on my soul. Social media led me down hallways of suffering, of fear, of self-righteousness. Someone tried to pull me down a YouTube rabbit hole and another pulled me toward a debate in a comment section. I’m embarrassed by the amount of time I spent yesterday being yanked around from one talking head to the next; and also by the amount of time I spent forming rebuttals in my head and arguments I would counter with, should I ever have the courage to voice what I think Christians ought to be saying right now—or, maybe more importantly, not saying.

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Spirit & Sound, Part 6: The Man Who Read with His Mouth Closed (And the Spirit Who Didn’t)

By Steve Guthrie

[Editor’s note: click here to read Part 5: The Preposition of Love.]

“We believe in the Holy Spirit. . . Who has spoken through the prophets.”

—The Nicene Creed

I am sitting in the upstairs office space of the Barn, by North Wind Manor. (The reconstruction of North Wind Manor that has been going on over the past several months is almost finished, and the place looks amazing!) Three staff members are in the room with me: Shigé, Pete, and Chris; each seated at a desk, each reading. What are they reading? I don’t know. I could find out, but I would have to ask. And this is one way in which reading in the contemporary world is different than it was (at least most of the time) in the ancient world. A famous story from St. Augustine’s (354-430) Confessions illustrates this point.

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Love and Assent

By Jonathan Rogers

While reading Wendell Berry’s story collection, That Distant Land, I was struck by this description of a character named Martha Elizabeth Coulter:

She was a woman always near to smiling, sometimes to laughter. Her face, it seems, had been made to smile. It was a face that assented wholly to the being of whatever or whomever she looked at.

—Wendell Berry, That Distant Land

I don’t know whether Wendell Berry is a student of Thomas Aquinas, but that description of Martha Elizabeth as a person who “assented wholly to the being” of the people and things around her sounds like the kind of thing Aquinas would say.

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The Door on Half-Bald Hill: Now Available on Audiobook

By The Rabbit Room

The Door on Half-Bald Hill takes place in an ancient Irish culture marked by its oral and aural storytelling tradition—which makes it a fantastic audiobook.⁣

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Writing Lessons from Monet

By Amy Baik Lee

On one of the golden swan song days of last October, my husband and I took our two small daughters to see the Claude Monet: Truth of Nature exhibit at the Denver Art Museum. Afterward, the road home was illuminated by a parting shot from the ripe autumn sun. The signs and curbs and fences stood fully exposed to it, as if they were having their faces washed by light.

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Spirit & Sound, Part 5: The Preposition of Love

By Steve Guthrie

[Editor’s note: click here to read Part 4: Sounding, Re-sounding, and the Antiphonal Shape of the World.]

How accurate one has to be with one’s prepositions! Perhaps it was a preposition wrong that set the whole world awry.

—Charles Williams, The Place of the Lion

The truth is, I’m not much of a stickler for grammar. But I do love this passage from Charles Williams’ The Place of the Lion. I love the prospect of all of history teetering precariously, balanced on the back of a couple innocuous looking letters. And I love thinking about whether Williams could actually be right. Could a mere “without” where there should have been a “within”—or perhaps an “above” that should have been “below”—really set the whole world out of joint?

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Gardening 101: Good Work is Boring

By Adam Whipple

My friend Kirby and I were going to play a show in an upscale planned community, and I felt the need to prepare him. “Just be forewarned,” I said. “I’ve been here before. It’s a little weird.”

We pulled into the drive, puttering past a capacious barn that looked a more like a Colonial Inn than any working barn I knew. A dainty roadside sign proudly offered to direct us to “Goat Yoga.”

“I see what you mean,” said Kirby.

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Spirit & Sound, Part 4: Sounding, Re-sounding, and the Antiphonal Shape of the World

By Steve Guthrie

[Editor’s note: click here to read Part 3: God in Motion.]

I believe in the Holy Spirit . . . 
Together with the Father and the Son He is worshipped and glorified.

—The Nicene Creed

On a recent Saturday morning, a text message popped up on the Rabbit Room Staff thread. Leslie Thompson, one of our staff members, was in Kentucky with her husband, hiking. She texted to tell us that as they drove to the trailhead that morning, they had passed a handmade sign fixed to a tree. It read: “Is He Worthy?” A hundred yards or so further along there was another tree, and another sign: “He is.”

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