Faith



Announcing WELL: Exploring the Healing Power of Art

By The Rabbit Room

We are thrilled to announce that on October 11th, an event named “WELL” will take place at Hutchmoot, featuring Sara Groves, Andrew Peterson, Eric Peters, Odessa Settles, Drew Miller, Ella Mine, and hosted by none other than Jonathan Rogers. Needless to say, we’re eagerly anticipating this night of songs and stories.

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Mites, Monocultures, and Making

By Mark Meynell

The book engrossed me so much that I found myself continuing to read it while going on a rollercoaster with my then young son. And I have the photographic evidence to prove it.

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Gbahuru Hini and the Grandeur of God

By Adam Huntley

Golowara. I think I know where this word comes from, but. . .what would that word mean to the people who are in the village churches?”

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Practicing Prodigality with The National

By Chris Wheeler

The song that drew me to The National at first was “I Need My Girl,” and I heard it during a very discouraging season of my life. It’s a worn irony, this aching comfort of sad songs for sad people, but when I first encountered Matt Berninger’s grainy, plaintive lyric “I keep feeling smaller and smaller,” I listened to the song on repeat for two hours. Since then I’ve been a foul-weather follower, if you will. Every time that certain loneliness or melancholy hits harder than normal, I know I’ve got someone who will sit still with me in that place for a while until it’s time to move forward.

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Lilith and Fantasy’s Inheritance

By Drew Miller

There are a great many things to be said about Lilith. Stepping through this arduous, masterful story felt something like watching an artist make his first few meager brushstrokes on a gigantic blank canvas: the first quarter or so of my reading experience was an uncomfortable exercise in waiting for those inaugural brushstrokes to find themselves surrounded by enough context to finally make sense.

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Recovering A Good Father

By Helena Sorensen

“Jesus didn’t come to change God’s mind about us. Jesus came to change our minds about God.”—Richard Rohr

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Playing in the Dark

By Adam Whipple

There are a number of quarries in and around Knoxville where lanky, dusty men used to blast marble out of the hills before the Depression. In fact, if you read the odd town-centric indie publication here or there, you’ll eventually dig your way into a vein of prose in which some loafered, office-bound journalist will wax poetic about the geological intricacies of East Tennessee’s pink marble. We should all dream so big.

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In Defense of the Amateur Spirit

By Drew Miller

During our 4th of July road trip, Kelsey and I listened to an interview with Nigella Lawson on The Splendid Table Podcast. She’s a little bothered by the privileging of the term “chef” over “home cook.” When people are just becoming interested in cooking for themselves, where do they turn but to the illustrious chefs on television with their fancy ways of chopping vegetables? And why should chefs get all the glory?

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New Hutchmoot Podcast Episode: Sailing Full and By

By The Rabbit Room

Only a very few novels come together in such a way as to perfectly capture the aspects of language, faith, adventure, beauty, and mystery that we love so much in the Rabbit Room, and Leif Enger is the rare author who has written more than one of them.

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For Those Who Rage Without Knowing Why

By Shigé Clark

A few weeks ago, I finally sat down and listened to Breaking Benjamin’s latest album Ember, and it has since become one of my favorite albums. Something fundamental clicked into place for me with this piece, and I’ve been trying for the last few weeks to unravel exactly what that is.

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Reading Bono

By Rebecca Reynolds

The weird thing is, I’ve never liked U2. From the few short clips I’d seen, Bono seemed arrogant and intentionally obtuse. Pictures of U2 concerts felt too big and too flashy to be sincere. I didn’t like how urban U2’s music felt—all that concrete, all those dirty streets, and so much black leather. His world was a foreign planet to a Wendell Berry country girl. Furthermore, the aesthetic of Bono’s music sounded angry, lost, and scratchy. I had trouble finding melodies and coherence.

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Love in an Age of Information Overload

By Phillip Johnston

When it comes to information, humanity has been playing a vast game of Tetris for thousands of years. New blocks of information are constantly being formed as we acquire new knowledge. As we encounter them, our objective is to rotate and place these informational blocks into our experience.

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