Music



Announcing WELL: Exploring the Healing Power of Art

By The Rabbit Room

We are thrilled to announce that on October 11th, an event named “WELL” will take place at Hutchmoot, featuring Sara Groves, Andrew Peterson, Eric Peters, Odessa Settles, Drew Miller, Ella Mine, and hosted by none other than Jonathan Rogers. Needless to say, we’re eagerly anticipating this night of songs and stories.

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The Resistance, Episode 11: Glen Phillips

By Matt Conner

For years, Glen Phillips says, it felt personal.

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New Release from Sandra McCracken: “Christ Is The Life of the World”

By The Rabbit Room

Last Friday, Sandra McCracken released her first piece of new music since Songs from the Valley: a hymn called “Christ Is The Life of the World.”

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The Resistance, Episode 10: Drew Holcomb

By Matt Conner

The moment he said it, I could feel its hooks sink deep.

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More Than My Lonely Nation

By Jen Rose Yokel

The year was 2005. I was a junior in college, and it felt like the world was both beckoning me to a wide open future and coming apart at the seams.

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New Album: Desolation & Consolation

By Drew Miller

For the past year, I’ve become deeply compelled by the words desolation and consolation. Neither are words we use a whole lot. But they each carry layers of subtle meaning, and I get the sense that they’ve got a lot to teach us.

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Practicing Prodigality with The National

By Chris Wheeler

The song that drew me to The National at first was “I Need My Girl,” and I heard it during a very discouraging season of my life. It’s a worn irony, this aching comfort of sad songs for sad people, but when I first encountered Matt Berninger’s grainy, plaintive lyric “I keep feeling smaller and smaller,” I listened to the song on repeat for two hours. Since then I’ve been a foul-weather follower, if you will. Every time that certain loneliness or melancholy hits harder than normal, I know I’ve got someone who will sit still with me in that place for a while until it’s time to move forward.

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The Resistance, Episode 9: Rules for Artists

By Matt Conner

This week, we have a special bonus episode that deviates from our typical interview format.

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Playing in the Dark

By Adam Whipple

There are a number of quarries in and around Knoxville where lanky, dusty men used to blast marble out of the hills before the Depression. In fact, if you read the odd town-centric indie publication here or there, you’ll eventually dig your way into a vein of prose in which some loafered, office-bound journalist will wax poetic about the geological intricacies of East Tennessee’s pink marble. We should all dream so big.

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The Resistance, Episode 8: Tokyo Police Club

By Matt Conner

The best of us move forward without hesitation. Dave Monks doesn’t operate that way—even though he should.

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For Those Who Rage Without Knowing Why

By Shigé Clark

A few weeks ago, I finally sat down and listened to Breaking Benjamin’s latest album Ember, and it has since become one of my favorite albums. Something fundamental clicked into place for me with this piece, and I’ve been trying for the last few weeks to unravel exactly what that is.

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Reading Bono

By Rebecca Reynolds

The weird thing is, I’ve never liked U2. From the few short clips I’d seen, Bono seemed arrogant and intentionally obtuse. Pictures of U2 concerts felt too big and too flashy to be sincere. I didn’t like how urban U2’s music felt—all that concrete, all those dirty streets, and so much black leather. His world was a foreign planet to a Wendell Berry country girl. Furthermore, the aesthetic of Bono’s music sounded angry, lost, and scratchy. I had trouble finding melodies and coherence.

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