Music



Hutchmoot Podcast & Video: Ain’t Gonna Lay My Religion Down

By The Rabbit Room

The Hutchmoot Podcast features some of our favorite sessions recorded at our annual conference which celebrates art, music, story, and faith in all their many intersections. Today, it is our pleasure to share a session led by Buddy Greene and Odessa Settles called “Ain’t Gonna Lay My Religion Down” from 2020’s Hutchmoot: Homebound, in both video and audio form.

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Introducing Hutchmoot: Homebound Rundowns

By The Rabbit Room

Hutchmoot: Homebound attendees, check your email inbox! Our inaugural rundown has been sent. With it in hand, you’ll be well on your way to navigating the vast terrain of discovery and surprise that is the Hutchmoot: Homebound website. Not sure what a Rundown is? Allow us to explain.

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The Local Show: Live from North Wind Manor

By The Rabbit Room

It’s time for our Fall 2021 season of The Local Show, live from North Wind Manor, beginning on Tuesday, September 7th with Becca Jordan, Drew Miller, Jeremy Casella, and Son of Laughter!

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Old Favorites: Andy Gullahorn’s Fault Lines

By Ron Block

Andy Gullahorn is a fixture on the Behold the Lamb of God tour. I’ve watched him play and sing nearly every year at the Ryman, marveling at the clarity of his voice, his touch, dynamics, tone, and sweet sense of taste on the guitar. He seems to do everything with ease, a kind of graceful, offhanded carelessness.

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New Album & Kickstarter: Deeper Into Love

By Jill Phillips

It’s been a long time since I’ve been in the studio recording new music, and I’m thrilled to share with you that I’ll be working on an EP with Ben Shive in the upcoming weeks. Ben and I have been friends for years since the early days of traveling with my husband, Andy Gullahorn, and Andrew Peterson (in a silver van!) to support our albums Love and Thunder and Writing on the Wall. Ben and I have been talking for years about writing and recording music together and it’s such a gift to have him working on this new material.

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New Album & Kickstarter: There Will Be Surprises

By Drew Miller

It was Pizza Night on Friday, March 13th, 2020. The candles were lit, the music was playing, and I had just adorned two old fashioneds with orange peels, ready for our weekly toast. That particular week had introduced Kelsey and me to the term “social distancing,” the idea of quarantine (surely no more than six weeks, right?), and freshly empty toilet paper shelves at the grocery store. Even in that moment, we were aware that what we were experiencing was a moment—the significance of which would only reveal itself in the slow unfolding of time’s many surprises.

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5&1, Part 25: Gazing Beyond the Stars

By Mark Meynell

Infinite space offers infinite inspiration. That’s because, in the immortal words of the late, great Douglas Adams, “Space is big. Really big. You just won’t believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it’s a long way down the road to the chemist’s, but that’s just peanuts to space.” So, as with almost every other playlist in this series, the number of potential inclusions is vast. Inevitably, here lies arbitrariness and exclusion—but I will pursue both with abandon.

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5&1, Part 24: Haunted by the Clarinet

By Mark Meynell

No instrument exactly mimics the human voice, of course, but the clarinet comes close. A remarkably versatile instrument, it’s capable of producing rich, mellow tones as a result of its precisely turned wooden barrel. But within a hare’s breath, its sound can be transfigured into one of such piercing intensity that a single instrument can effortlessly cut through an entire orchestra, rising high above surrounding instruments in both tone and volume. This is because of the use of a single reed (a strip of vibrating cane attached to the mouthpiece—unlike the two reeds bound together on the oboe, the clarinet’s is fixed against the wood). The performer blows wind over the reed to make the sound, but it demands strong lungs managed by supreme breath control. That is simply to prevent it making ugly squeaks and screeches! To make it truly ‘sing’? Well, that requires incredible skill and experience.

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Hutchmoot: Homebound Speakers & Musicians

By The Rabbit Room

We’re so excited to announce many more session leaders and musicians who will be joining us at Hutchmoot: Homebound 2021. And since it’s quite a long list of names, we found that the only suitable way to share them would be in classic summer-music-festival-fashion. Drumroll, please!

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5&1, Part 23: The Calls of the Birds

By Mark Meynell

It is only natural that those of an artistic temperament will be drawn to the natural world. Forms of human creativity are almost bound to be captivated by aspects of divine creativity. Consider the landscapes of the Hudson River School (like those of Frederic Church or Thomas Cole); or the profound attention to nature’s exuberance in Vincent van Gogh or kaleidoscopic shifts in light in Claude Monet; or the human realities in the biblical story as captured by Rembrandt or Giotto. Then, when it comes to words, just a couple of minutes in Gerard Manley Hopkins’s company will awaken us to what we’re constantly surrounded by but too often overlook.

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The Resistance: Emile Mosseri

By The Rabbit Room

[Editor’s note: As a companion piece to Jennifer Trafton’s essay this morning on the magic of Mary Poppins, here’s a conversation about the craft of scoring films with Emile Mosseri, known most recently for his work on Minari and The Last Black Man in San Francisco.]

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Born to Fly: Mary Poppins, Bruce Springsteen, and the Spell of Immortality

By Jennifer Trafton

[Editor’s note: Our theme for this last day of North Wind Manor’s Opening Week is film, and this evening we’ll be enjoying a private screening of one of our favorite recent films. Here’s one of the most well-loved pieces from the past few years on the blog that engages with the craft of film: an essay by Jennifer Trafton on the mythologies of Mary Poppins and Bruce Springsteen and what they can teach us about freedom, imagination, and the human longing to reclaim playfulness.]

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