Poetry



The Resistance, Episode 19: Jericho Brown

By Matt Conner

Jericho Brown was not waiting for these rewards, although we’re certain he’ll gladly receive them.

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Wounded by Beauty: Robert Frost, Douglas McKelvey, and Hope in Sorrow

By Emily Zaiser Wade

“We feel ourselves wounded by what is wretched, foul, and fell,
but we are sometimes wounded by the beauty as well, for when it whispers,
it whispers of the world
that might have been our birthright,
now banished…”
—Douglas McKelvey, Every Moment Holy

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What We Cannot See: A Lenten Reflection

By Helena Sorensen

Most of the light in the universe is invisible to the human eye. We see an estimated .0035% of the electromagnetic spectrum, and that estimate is based on what we can measure with current information and technology. The eye takes in a tiny fraction of what is real and present. Or, stated differently, the scope of what we cannot see is vast.

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A Letter and a Poem

By Shigé Clark

As Valentine’s Day came closing in, Jonathan Rogers sent out the following letter on The Habit Weekly.

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Dancing Through the Fire

By Malcolm Guite

[Editor’s note: In case you didn’t know, Malcolm Guite has an excellent collection of poetry for the seasons of Lent and Easter—one poem for each day, including classics like Dante, contemporaries like Rowan Williams, and the work of Guite himself. The collection is called The Word in the Wilderness, and it makes an excellent companion to the Lenten season. To give you a taste, here’s a poem of Guite’s called “Dancing Through the Fire.”]

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Poet’s Corner

By Malcolm Guite

I was giving a lecture in Oxford the other day, and took the opportunity, as I often do, to drop into the Eagle and Child. It’s a fine old 17th-century pub, unspoiled by “improvement;” it still has a couple of those lovely wood-panelled “snugs” which encourage camaraderie and close conversation—and, most famously, “the Rabbit Room,” where C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, Charles Williams, and their friends met on Tuesday lunchtimes, for the kind of sparring, cajoling, but ultimately encouraging conversation that was at the heart of their informal club, “The Inklings.” As Lewis said of these pub sessions in a letter to his friend Arthur Greeves: “The fun is often so fast and furious that the company probably thinks we’re talking bawdy when in fact we’re very likely talking theology.”

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The King of Autumn

By Chris Yokel

In the spirit of fall, here’s a “lost verse” from Douglas McKelvey’s liturgy of “Praise to the King of Creation.”

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Transposing Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queene

By Rebecca Reynolds

One of the most brilliant aspects of The Faerie Queene also makes this work inaccessible to most modern readers. For approximately 35,000 lines, Spenser writes in verse (tight poetic form).

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The Poetry Pub Presents Our First Community Chapbook

By Jen Rose Yokel

It started with an open mic and a semicircle of chairs in a church classroom in Nashville, TN.

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Introducing The Habit Podcast with Jonathan Rogers: Episode 1

By The Rabbit Room

It’s no secret that Jonathan Rogers is a wellspring of writerly wisdom, a masterful storyteller, and a disarming conversationalist. He has all kinds of resources available at his website—and now, he’s teaming up with the Rabbit Room Podcast Network to launch The Habit Podcast.

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Mother’s Day

By Rebecca Reynolds

I remember what it was like to want a baby.

I remember how it felt to walk through the grocery store Read More ›

Beyond the Footlights

By Helena Sorensen

I had not meant to think on dancers
No, nor womanhood
I meant to write of summer,
Goodness, and the love of God.

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