Story



An Apologetic for Storytelling

By Ben Palpant

I’ve always been a storyteller. My poor mother! I used to recount every life event in technicolor for her, even movies. She didn’t have to see the movies herself; her son had already reenacted them in their entirety. I think I told stories to know that I wasn’t alone. I wanted to see if the story made others feel the way that it made me feel. I wanted to see if it moved them and transformed them, too.

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The Molehill Podcast: Feelings Like Water (feat. Helena Sorensen & Adam Whipple)

By The Rabbit Room

Wherein Adam Whipple reads his poems “The Knowing is in Silence” and “Swimming at Meads,” Helena Sorensen reads her piece Feelings Like Water, and Drew Miller shares the third Word of Befuddlement: obloot.

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The Song that was Sharper than Sting

By Bethany J. Melton

Samwise had climbed too many stairs with Shagrat drooling on his heels. He’d blasted through Cirith Ungol’s gates with Galadriel’s light. He’d searched every black corner for Frodo, and now, his master was a tower trapdoor out of reach.

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Hutchmoot: Homebound Schedule of Events

By The Rabbit Room

Whether you’ve already bought your ticket and want to see all you have to look forward to, or you’re on the fence and want to know more before you commit, here is how we’ll be spending our weekend on October 9th-11th.

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Realism of Presentation, Realism of Content

By Jonathan Rogers

In An Experiment in Criticism, C. S. Lewis puts a finger on one of the things I love so much about Tolkien, though Lewis is not specifically talking about his good friend Tolkien’s stories. In the chapter “On Realisms,” Lewis distinguishes between what he calls “realism of presentation” and “realism of content.” Realism of presentation refers to those little concrete details that give the world of a story the textures that make it feel like the world God made. Realism of presentation, writes Lewis, “is the art of bringing something close to us, making it palpable and vivid, by sharply observed or sharply imagined detail.”

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The Molehill Podcast: Welcome to the Wilderness (feat. Don Chaffer & Rebecca Reynolds)

By The Rabbit Room

Wherein Rebecca Reynolds kicks off the show with her poem “Welcome,” Don Chaffer reads The Wilderness Journal, and Drew Miller shares the first ever Word of Befuddlement: pleethe.

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Clinging to the True Story

By Katie Butler

Her head slouched to one side on the pillow, and her breath rattled through a slackened jaw. As I watched from the doorway, my hands plunged into the pockets of my white coat to hide their worrying, I wondered how many great-grandbabies she’d spoiled, how many Italian treats she sneaked into their sticky hands between stirs of marinara bubbling on her stove. I wondered about the people she’d loved and lost, the memories she cherished. And my stomach twisted as her daughter, whom the coronavirus had stranded hundreds of miles away, whispered goodbye over Zoom.

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Introducing The Molehill Podcast

By Drew Miller

All of us have our main thing, whether we call it a career, a profession, a calling, or a vocation. It’s the primary occupant of our waking attention, it’s what we’re known for, and if we’re fortunate, it even pays the bills. But the hidden talent, the passion project, the side hustle—there’s an energy there that you can’t find anywhere else. It’s almost a kind of playfulness, an innocence reminiscent of childhood make-believe, untarnished by the urgencies of the everyday. That’s what The Molehill, the Rabbit Room’s annual literary journal, is for.

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Taper of Grief

By Amy Baik Lee

Outside, coursing in from the west, the amber and violet gloaming has begun.

Dinner is over, and I sit at the piano. Behind me a stream of girlish laughter twirls and dashes through the living room in response to the film music I’m playing, but my own shoulders are weighted, as if a hollow has been carved between them, and lead poured in.

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New Speakers & Performers Announced for Hutchmoot: Homebound

By The Rabbit Room

One of our favorite parts of Hutchmoot each year is gathering together a plethora of voices to contribute to the ongoing conversation around music, story, and art. This year we’re excited both to welcome back familiar voices and welcome in some new ones. Here’s an updated list of speakers and performers who will be leading us in our time together.

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Registration Now Open for Hutchmoot: Homebound

By The Rabbit Room

Registration for Hutchmoot: Homebound is officially open—and we’re so glad to tell you that there’s a seat for everyone at the (virtual) table this year. Now that tickets are available, here are some more specifics regarding what this unique Hutchmoot will consist of, what you can expect, and some frequently asked questions.

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A Path of Delight: Building the World of The Door on Half-Bald Hill

By Helena Sorensen

I’d forgotten how chaotic it feels in the midst of the research process. I look back at the path that brought me from an initial idea to a completed, printed copy of The Door on Half-Bald Hill and everything falls into sequence. The journey has a beautiful logic to it, as though I always knew where it would end and what it would become.

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