Story



Seeing with Our Ears: A Review of A. S. Peterson’s Frankenstein

By Adam Whipple

The country of radio theater has long been depopulated, but still its fields are fertile as ever they were. There, the imagination grows high, strengthened by roots which must dig deep to find purchase. Artists and craftspeople have long known: a good way to enrich one’s work is by limiting materials. Take away a color or two from your palette. Use only hand tools on your woodwork. Cook your meat plain, with heat, smoke, and nothing else. In radio theater, we forego our eyes; therefore our minds rocket into the realms of possibility.

So goes A. S. Peterson’s Frankenstein.

Read More ›

Boils & Possums & Kierkegaard, Oh My!

By J Lind

To get where I’m going, I first need to invite you to my pity party. Please come, and please bring some levity.

Read More ›

A Conversation with the Cosmos on the Eve of their Departure

By Gina Sutphin

Today I am sitting with the cosmos. It is the eve of their impending demise and we have much to catch up on before they slip away. For months, I have been watchful of their progress. After a few moments of greeting pleasantries, I ask them how they have been and then listen quietly as they begin.

The Molehill Podcast Halloween Edition: A Shade of Yellow (feat. Pete Peterson)

By The Rabbit Room

Wherein Pete Peterson reads his ghost story “A Shade of Yellow,” Zach & Maggie treat us to a special Halloween song, and we are visited by Drew’s evil twin.

Read More ›

Frankenstein: An Audio Performance

By The Rabbit Room

The art of theater is inherently transient—a well-rehearsed play is an enormous labor, only to be enjoyed a handful of times by a handful of audiences. A. S. Peterson’s adaptation of Frankenstein was a tremendous gift to all who were able to see it live. For everyone else, it has been confined to a printed script.

Until now! We at the Rabbit Room are so glad to announce—just in time for Halloween—a special audio performance of the play, now available in audiobook form. And you can hear a ten-minute preview here in this blog post.

Read More ›

The Molehill Podcast: When the Angel Stirred the Waters (feat. Jonathan Rogers, Jen Rose Yokel & Rebecca Reynolds)

By The Rabbit Room

Wherein Jen Rose Yokel reads her poem “When I See It” and her piece “Beneath the Flood,” Rebecca Reynolds reads her poems “Dear Students” and “The Farmer,” Jonathan Rogers reads his short story “When the Angel Stirred the Waters,” and Drew Miller thanks you for listening to Season 1 of The Molehill Podcast.

Read More ›

Hutchmoot: Homebound Archive Access Extended

By The Rabbit Room

We’re not ready for the fun to end. So we are extending archive access for Hutchmoot: Homebound 2020 until November 15th—for everyone.

Read More ›

The Molehill Podcast: The Integrated Imagination (feat. Andrew Peterson & Shigé Clark)

By The Rabbit Room

Wherein Shigé Clark reads her poems “The Origin of Wind” and “Love Is This,” Andrew Peterson reads “The Integrated Imagination” from his book Adorning the Dark, Drew Miller shares this week’s Word of Befuddlement (“spudgeon”), and we receive a special visit from Drew of the Future.

Read More ›

Hutchmoot 2020 Re-entry: It Takes All of Us

By Drew Miller

As our collaborative Doxology’s final “Amen” rang out in North Wind Manor, I looked around and saw that my tears were shared by everyone else in the room. 185 voices from around the world: a harmony achieved miraculously in isolation, joining defiantly in that perpetual song from the dawn of all Creation (“praise God, from whom all blessings flow”) at the end of a long weekend, at the twilight of a very long year—I guess it just did us in.

Read More ›

Convene the Hutchmoot: 2020

By Drew Miller

Four months ago, the Rabbit Room began wondering, dreaming, asking how in the world we were going to adapt to 2020 when it came to our biggest event of the year: Hutchmoot.⁣

Read More ›

Dear Mabel

By Rachel Matar

Dear Mabel,

You gave me a gift before I learned how to talk, much less how to write a proper thank-you. A $25 savings bond, invested at the time of my birth, to mature sometime in my early adulthood. It matured, and so have I, and now this 30 year-old has $150 to spend.

Read More ›

An Apologetic for Storytelling

By Ben Palpant

I’ve always been a storyteller. My poor mother! I used to recount every life event in technicolor for her, even movies. She didn’t have to see the movies herself; her son had already reenacted them in their entirety. I think I told stories to know that I wasn’t alone. I wanted to see if the story made others feel the way that it made me feel. I wanted to see if it moved them and transformed them, too.

Read More ›