• “He creates a world into which suffering will be birthed by sin and the cosmic weight of that suffering will be borne by Himself. It’s the last half of that statement that keeps such an answer from seeming trite and removed from our present pain. The suffering Christ makes sense of the senseless.” You hit the nail on the head. I find myself l…[Read more]

  • As the closing notes of Jeremy Casella’s new album ring out, I find myself exhaling, my body and mind having settled deeply into sounds and words that evoke comfort, peace, and that most distinct of […]

  • I’ll begin with something of a confession: While I enjoy lots of music, and there’s an abundance of excellent artists and well-crafted songs these days, and it’s marvelous to behold—very rarely do I hear a song o […]

    • I recently heard Letter to the Editor, exactly when I needed someone to put into words questions that I didn’t even know I needed to ask. It untangled a mess of jumbled emotions–anger, despair, guilt, sadness, & left me undone at my work desk (& really glad no one was looking my direction to see the tears). I finally just now listened to the rest of the album, & I wholeheartedly agree–the whole thing is a an incredible, unique work.

  • This song began with a dream that my wife, Kelsey, had, in which a group of well-dressed, professional-looking young men filed quietly into our house and proceeded to steal all our belongings, filling cardboard […]

  • Aims and Profile picture of Drew MillerDrew Miller are now friends 1 year, 7 months ago

  • The week after Hutchmoot last year, I did two things: bought a guitar I’d been eyeing up all summer and wrote this song on it. When my wife, Kelsey, went to bed, I was strumming five chords. When she woke up, I h […]

  • Coming up on Friday, September 6th, my church family is hosting a night of cover songs from our favorite—and not-so-favorite—decades. Ticket sales will go towards families in our community pursuing adoption. Art […]

  • Jen, thanks for this. I’ve been singing “The Blues” all week, especially in the wake of last weekend. “Does justice never find you? Do the wicked never lose? Is there any honest song to sing besides these blues? And nothing is okay until the sky falls down, and the hungry and the poor and deserted are found…” I can barely type those lyrics…[Read more]

  • For the past year, I’ve become deeply compelled by the words desolation and consolation. Neither are words we use a whole lot. But they each carry layers of subtle meaning, and I get the sense that they’ve got […]

    • “While many negative emotions accompany a word like desolation, the most haunting part to me is that the word itself is indifferent to them.’ Wow. Loved hearing more of your thoughts on the album and the journey of creating it, Drew!

  • J—well said! I’m on board.
    A church friend of mine was involved in a high school production of the Lion King last spring. Kelsey and I went…and wept. I was ashamed. But I was also reminded what a beautiful story it is.

  • “Hayao Miyazaki used film in the way that MacDonald used pages, and I find them both to be the two most inspirational creators I have encountered.” Jeremiah, that’s so well-said. I feel a lot of kindredness between those two voices as well, though I’ve never seen either of the two Ghibli films you mentioned. My favorite at this point, having seen…[Read more]

  • There are a great many things to be said about Lilith. Stepping through this arduous, masterful story felt something like watching an artist make his first few meager brushstrokes on a gigantic blank canvas: the […]

    • A big one for me was Stephen R. Donaldson’s 1st and 2nd Chronicles of Thomas Covenant. It’s dark and complicated and indulgent and jam-packed with hard and complex truths that I still think about to this day. Great post, Drew. Lilith is one of my favorite books and you’ve articulated many of the reasons why.

    • I remember reading The Silent Planet, how Earth was the planet no one talked about and why that was so. It made me look at the Fall in an entirely new perspective.

    • “Hayao Miyazaki used film in the way that MacDonald used pages, and I find them both to be the two most inspirational creators I have encountered.” Jeremiah, that’s so well-said. I feel a lot of kindredness between those two voices as well, though I’ve never seen either of the two Ghibli films you mentioned. My favorite at this point, having seen just a few, is Princess Mononoke.
      And Pete, I’ve never heard of that or heard you talk about it before! I’ll definitely have to check it out. Dark, complicated, indulgent, hard and complex truths…I often find that I like all those things 🙂

    • J—well said! I’m on board.
      A church friend of mine was involved in a high school production of the Lion King last spring. Kelsey and I went…and wept. I was ashamed. But I was also reminded what a beautiful story it is.

  • JR, thanks for that kind, encouraging comment. I had forgotten that Capon addresses that word “amateur” so directly in Supper of the Lamb. What a guy. “A silent lover is one who doesn’t know his job”—such an excellent quote. He hit the nail on the head. And for the record, I’d love to see you take up cross-stitching.

    Caleb, I agree with JR…[Read more]

  • During our 4th of July road trip, Kelsey and I listened to an interview with Nigella Lawson on The Splendid Table Podcast. She’s a little bothered by the privileging of the term “chef” over “home cook.” When peop […]

    • Wow and yes and amen. Thank you, Drew, for wrestling these ideas down and putting them into words. I need to print out this essay and frame it and put it on my desk. Or put it on a t-shirt. Or maybe I’ll take up cross-stitching. Your essay put me in mind of this passage from Robert Farrar Capon’s Supper of the Lamb:
      “The world may or may not need another cookbook, but it needs all the lovers – amateurs – it can get. It is a gorgeous old place, full of clownish graces and beautiful drolleries, and it has enough textures, tastes, and smells to keep us intrigued for more time than we have. Unfortunately, however, our response to its loveliness is not always delight: It is, far more often than it should be, boredom. And that is not only odd, it is tragic; for boredom is not neutral – it is the fertilizing principle of unloveliness.

      In such a situation, the amateur – the lover, the man who thinks heedlessness is a sin and boredom a heresy – is just the man you need. More than that, whether you think you need him or not, he is a man who is bound, by his love, to speak. If he loves Wisdom or the Arts, so much the better for him and for all of us. But if he loves only the way meat browns or onions peel, if he delights simply in the curds of his cheese or the color of his wine, he is, by every one of those enthusiasms, commanded to speak. A silent lover is one who doesn’t know his job.”
      And @caleb-fetterhoff, I hope you’ll bear in mind that the arts are only one small slice of the creativity pie. Every time you tell a truer story than the world is telling–by whatever means are at your disposal–you’re being creative. I don’t know what kind of work you’re doing in rural Africa, but I suspect it’s pretty creative.

    • You’re right, @jonathanrogers, and I do forget it so often, that art-making is not the only creative act. I guess there is creativity (by your generous definition) in my work; I need to learn to think of it that way: that each task and conversation is an opportunity to express creativity. And then on to infusing that spirit of love into all my work and actions, as Drew encouraged us.

    • Thank you for writing this, Mr. Miller. I really appreciate this encouragement, especially since I run a Christian literary magazine that publishes artwork, stories, articles, and more by amateur artists like the ones you spoke of. I thought I might say that anyone is allowed to submit and/or subscribe to this monthly publication, Stories Under the Sun. Our website is http://www.storiesunderthesun.weebly.com. If you’re one of those people like me who loves to write or draw just for fun, and you would like a cost-free way to publish your work, consider supporting us by submitting to the journal. We are still developing and would appreciate your help!

    • JR, thanks for that kind, encouraging comment. I had forgotten that Capon addresses that word “amateur” so directly in Supper of the Lamb. What a guy. “A silent lover is one who doesn’t know his job”—such an excellent quote. He hit the nail on the head. And for the record, I’d love to see you take up cross-stitching.

      Caleb, I agree with JR on that one. Maybe it’s become a bit of a cliche to say that there’s nothing outside the realm of creativity, but it’s cliche because it’s true. I hope you’re able to find some new ways to bring creativity into your days over there.

      Meredith, what’s the name of your book coming out in October? Congrats!

    • Thank you so much for these encouraging words! Amateur = Lover . . . that’s so incredibly freeing, and it is why the Rabbit Room and its whole philosophy for embracing creativity is so revolutionary. The outside world legitimizes only what it monetizes, and that can become downright crippling to the God-given passions within us. We need all the reminders (and kicks in the pants) we can get to spur on some beauty, beginning in our selves and our homes and working out into the whole world from there. Thank you again!

    • Drew, thank you for making this distinction! After coming back from Oxford, I have an even clearer sense of why I love the Rabbit Room community, and you’ve put your finger on it. This community feels safe and beautiful because we’re all “unabashed” in our love for Jesus and the world and the arts and food and story and so forth. We’re free to engage with one another instead of competing with one another, because we define success differently. Isn’t it wonderful? And isn’t it so like the Kingdom?

    • Drew, THANK YOU for writing this. It’s one of those things that has often passed through my mind but that I could never fully form into a coherent and persuasive assertion. Thank you for doing so! It’s beautifully said, and all the more meaningful COMING from a professional. I’ll be passing this around a lot.

  • The Habit Podcast is a series of conversations with writers about writing, hosted by Jonathan Rogers. In today’s episode, Jonathan Rogers interviews Claire Gibson.

    In this episode, Jonathan Rogers […]

  • The Habit Podcast is a series of conversations with writers about writing, hosted by Jonathan Rogers. Today’s episode features a conversation with Christopher Williams.

    In this episode, Jonathan Rogers […]

  • Wendy, it’s a painting called “A girl at the piano” by Poul Friis Nybo.

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