• Yesterday, the heaviness of a world under a global pandemic became an almost unbearable weight on my soul. Social media led me down hallways of suffering, of fear, of self-righteousness. Someone tried to pull me […]

    • What a well-written, grounding meditation! I’ve been reading Psalm 147, where the psalmist encourages Israel’s exiles to consider concrete reminders of God’s provisions large and small: this is the God who both covers the world in snow like ashes and takes time to feed a nestful of croaking young ravens. When the world is sick in so many ways, it’s easy to just want to toss it away. What a good reminder to slow down and take delight in it instead!

  • @ferly, I’m so glad this resonated with you, and yet I know that also means that you are weary. I’m encouraged by hearing others’ pilgrim songs, too. May God bless your journey and I’ll see you at The Table!

  • I came to know Wendell Berry at the wrong time in my life. My husband and I, with three children in tow, had just barely gotten our feet on the ground after moving away from a place and a people that we had […]

    • This is really beautiful, Elizabeth. Love, love, love.

    • I love this so much!

    • Elizabeth, this is so lovely and much-needed. I’ve moved around my entire life many times – to the point that if someone asks me where I’m from, I don’t feel like I have an honest answer for them except “everywhere.” But I’m certain that I would not love our true Home nearly as much without this continued lack of a physical home to belong to. I’m very grateful that there are others out there like you who understand – thank you so much for sharing!

    • @ferly, I’m so glad this resonated with you, and yet I know that also means that you are weary. I’m encouraged by hearing others’ pilgrim songs, too. May God bless your journey and I’ll see you at The Table!

  • In 1905, a young Hilda Edwards entered onto the scene in Christmas Cove, Maine, likely weary from her trip from England. She was only fifteen years old and had come over from her home in Bristol to live with her […]

  • Whoever added Johnny and June— high five! I love this playlist, thanks Rabbit Room tape-mixers!

  • David, I hadn’t a clue of its existence! Thank you. I’m glad to hear they have a chance at a happy(ier?) ending.

  • “The unicorn lived in a lilac wood, and she lived all alone.” This is how Peter S. Beagle swings open the door to the world of his classic, The Last Unicorn. But before I was able to make words out of let […]

    • Have you read Peter Beagle’s Two Hearts? It’s a short-fiction sequel to The Last Unicorn. I approached it with some trepidation because I would have hated to see an unworthy coda to the Amalthea-Lír story, but I thought it was beautiful.

    • This is beautiful, thank you.

    • David, I hadn’t a clue of its existence! Thank you. I’m glad to hear they have a chance at a happy(ier?) ending.

  • Hi, K. Rose! As I admitted in this piece, I’m a new reader of Mary Oliver. Others may have more input, but I started with “New and Selected Poems, Volume One” which is a collection of her poems that span her life/career. I found them to be beautiful, of course, but also very accessible. I think that’s why she’s such a beloved poet— deep waters…[Read more]

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  • Jennifer, this is beautiful. I am thrilled at the thought of Jesus swinging the door open for me– further up, further in! Thank you for the joy and freedom you just offered me with your words! This reminded me of a L’Engle quote: “And what is real? Does the work of art have a reality beyond that of the artist’s vision…?If the artist is the…[Read more]

  • Last fall, our family took a morning to hike up the craggy paths of the North Georgia mountains. We knew our end: a precipice overlooking the tops of the newly bronzed and coppered trees. But there was a long […]

    • This is beautiful. I love Mary Oliver’s poetry for all the same reasons, and “When Death Comes” is one of my favorites!

    • great article! I love they way Elizabeth used how hiking through nature and getting caught up is like the way poetry catches us and stops to make you think in life.

    • This is just lovely! I am just starting to get into reading poetry again. I love the way you explain this, giving meaning and importance to the time spent working through a good volume. I admit I have never read much of Mary Oliver’s work, but have added her to my list!

    • Ahh! Poetry! Yes!!
      Words of poetry are one of the staples for me in feeding my soul in a world so chaotic and noisy, so disorganized and harried.
      At lunchtime today I read a beautiful one titled “Attending” in Luci Shaw’s latest book “Eye of the Beholder,” which I highly recommend.
      I agree that “maybe what our world needs most right now is a little more poetry…”
      Words that arise out of stillness, and feed our hearts, minds, and souls with beauty, grace, and renewing perspective – that give us places to breathe silence and wonder once again…

    • “I don’t want to end up simply having visited this world.”

      Ahhhhhhh so good.

    • How beautifully written! Where would you recommend a person begin with reading Mary Oliver?

    • Hi, K. Rose! As I admitted in this piece, I’m a new reader of Mary Oliver. Others may have more input, but I started with “New and Selected Poems, Volume One” which is a collection of her poems that span her life/career. I found them to be beautiful, of course, but also very accessible. I think that’s why she’s such a beloved poet— deep waters, but easy entries for even those who are afraid to read poetry.

    • Thankee, @elizabeth-harwell ! I’m happy to journey in Mary Oliver alongside another new reader, & this still gives me somewhere to start.

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