• So grateful for this song, Andrew. So meaningful. I cannot stop reflecting on it.

  • I believe quite a few Rabbits have made their way to Oxford over the years. Could I get some advice for an upcoming visit?

    For business, I will be traveling to Southampton. My goal, however, is to fly in a day early and spend some time in Oxford. Really, just a day. I will be landing in London/Gatwick Saturday afternoon, June 24 and taking a…[Read more]

  • Lately, I have been thinking about the theology of art. Almost certainly this is a bad use of my mind, as I am neither a theologian nor an artist. But I cannot help myself. And I feel compelled to think out loud, […]

    • Those who have ears to hear…

    • Meg replied 2 years ago

      I’m intrigued. So much so that I am willing to overcome my pride, admit my ignorance and beg for a few more clues as to the meaning. Art and theology. Perfect art and perfect theology can’t be combined? We have to preserve the purity of our art and theology against anything from outside?

    • A few scattered responses…

      “[She who] breaks a thing to find out what it is has left the path of wisdom.”

      The crooked eye that lacks a perception of depth, but can make beautiful colored abstractions… That was a great element, and describes modern art in a very clear way.

      Pottery seems chosen exactly because it is a 3d medium, thus having depth, but also because it requires a Form. Additionally, one could say that it may be appropriate because it has both beauty and function, as art from the Christian standpoint can be said to both please and instruct.

    • @racheldonahue

      Thank you for that last thought! The two types of sets are fantastic. I’m going to use this in my RCIA class. Thanks for that image!

    • @racheldonahue

      Thank you for that last thought! The two types of sets are fantastic. I’m going to use this in my RCIA class. Thanks for that image!

  • Thanks, Jen. This topic has been on my heart and mind for so long. The last, oh I don’t know, about 3 weeks have had me in a near panic, scrolling through Twitter and glancing at headlines. It cannot be healthy.

    Your point about being fast to read and express an opinion is so good. @Pete and other Rabbit Room lights have been great at slowing…[Read more]

  • Thanks for sharing your life, Doug. Keep writing. Please!

  • Love the quotes, Trice and @danrechlin – thanks for sharing. It is so interesting how, by making up worlds, fantasy illuminates our world and sounds universally familiar to everyone.

  • One of my favorite anticipations of the new year is the first book I will read. Some time ago, for a few years in a row, I started each new January rereading Frederick Buechner’s Godric. And I’ve returned more t […]

    • Awareness of this seems like a great thing to have.  I’ve been going to job interviews lately, and the other people there often tell stories about a common, “standard” type interview question: ‘what books have you read lately,’ which is inevitably followed up with ‘why did you like this or that one.’  I was never asked this, but the thought of being in that situation terrified me a little, and I think your question is exactly why.  In the words of the inimitable Peter Furler, “How do you define what you can’t compare?”  Not that being aware of this helps answer the hypothetical interviewer’s question at all, but it can hopefully help keep one from appearing foolish as we try to speak our way around this mystery.

    • Love the quotes, Trice and @danrechlin – thanks for sharing. It is so interesting how, by making up worlds, fantasy illuminates our world and sounds universally familiar to everyone.

    • I remember reading The Left Hand of Darkness in college (for a sci-fi as literature class, which was as awesome as that sounds). Such an interesting book that I’d love to revisit! Her statement that science fiction is descriptive, not predictive rings true. So many sci-fi stories are grappling with something that is already true, but in fantastic locales or (not-so?)distant futures. Sometimes we need a different setting to see the underlying reality more clearly.

      Annnnnnnnd now I wanna read something by Le Guin this year.

    • I read The Left Hand of Darkness about two years ago, and I was struck by how it felt both disconnected from anything I had ever experienced and unnervingly familiar. I began this year with The Lathe of Heaven. You walk away saying, “That was weird,” but you can’t quite shake the feeling that she got to you. I much prefer LeGuin’s fantasy (The Earthsea Series!), because it feels more grounded, more mythological, and that suits my tastes. But there is a reason her work has been heavily awarded and that it is still discussed decades after she wrote it. She is Taoist, and yet her stories tap into so many profound truths.

  • In What Makes A Great Christian Novel @andrew asked what are some of the best Christian novels. Some of the comments included a conversation about what exactly is a “Christian” novel. Or, we could extrapolate, what is specifically Christian art?

    I have been reading through Dorothy Sayers’s Letters to a Diminished Church and recently got th…[Read more]

  • @glennmccarty @barberjo just want to affirm the great work John Walton is doing with his work on Genesis.

    John B – I started 2017 reading Ursula Le Guin’s The Left Hand of Darkness. It was really good.

  • @andrew please do write that next post! I want to think that there is a “Christian” way to do things, including write novels. But what I struggle to reconcile is that sometimes non-Christians seem to do things the Christian way. Sometimes, when that happens, it does not seem like there’d be a more Christian way to do the same thing; perhaps, other…[Read more]

  • The Power and the Glory by Graham Greene comes to mind.

    And here’s another question. Could we expand the definition of “Christian novel” to include stories written by non-Christians but that explore themes of truth? I think about Umberto Eco or Philip K. Dick. Hardly the most Christian of men. But their novels are ripe with theology and…[Read more]

  • Love this. Nice orientation for a New Year of adventuring in the Kingdom.

  • At Hutchmoot this year, Russ Ramsey and I spoke about being a hospitable critic. How do we bring a critic’s voice to the public square in a hospitable way? I am particularly interested to explore how we can do t […]

    • The connection to Rivendell is insightful indeed! Rivendell had a comfortable atmosphere, but it also had a gentle, noninvasive wisdom that could be felt everywhere. This is what soothed the fear, tension, and distrust for the moment (though it would resurface later). The peace created a reverent awe.
      I have found much success in the wisdom that “a gentle response turns away wrath” (Proverbs 15:1). Often times, gentleness creates a Rivendell-like atmosphere online. Lighthearted (non-flippant and non-mocking) humor has this effect as well. The self-deprecating kind is usually the best, too. Chesterton is a great model for us here.
       
      Both of these (plus a dogged determination to listen) have the effect of humanizing the “bits and bytes” of our online communication.
      This is a heartening piece.  Thank you!

    • The connection to Rivendell is insightful indeed! Rivendell had a comfortable atmosphere, but it also had a gentle, noninvasive wisdom that could be felt everywhere. This is what soothed the fear, tension, and distrust for the moment (though it would resurface later). The peace created a reverent awe.
      I have found much success in the wisdom that “a gentle response turns away wrath” (Proverbs 15:1). Often times, gentleness creates a Rivendell-like atmosphere online. Lighthearted (non-flippant and non-mocking) humor has this effect as well. The self-deprecating kind is usually the best, too. Chesterton is a great model for us here.
       
      Both of these (plus a dogged determination to listen) have the effect of humanizing the “bits and bytes” of our online communication.
      This is a heartening piece.  Thank you!

    • Excellent, Dave. The image of the Council of Elrond is spot-on. Even the manner in which Elrond charged the Fellowship’s members before sending them out — not requiring oaths, not even requiring all nine members to go all the way to Mordor — evidenced a remarkable degree of trust.

  • Count me in! And, I like space.

  • A while back I introduced the Civil Language Project to the Rabbit Room. Then a couple of weeks ago when I walked through the doors of Church of the Redeemer to participate in the seventh year of Hutchmoot, Pete P […]

    • …Whaaat did i just read? Haha. i love the Rabbit Room. XD Mr. Bruno, you have a new fan. XD

      Staying tuned for the hospitality, and thank you, Editor. 😛

    • I hereby commission either Stephen Hesselman or Jonny Jimison to illustrate this!

    • This is so delightfully weird. Thanks for this. 😀 Long live The Civil Language Project! I can’t wait to read your thoughts on hospitality.

    • @firstcrusader,  I’d settle for the original source of that header image for a start. Tineye is giving me a lot of noise…

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