• David Michael Bruno started the topic in the forum 4 years, 5 months ago

    Howdy friends, I will be in Nashville on business August 6-8. Would anyone be interested in getting together Sunday evening, August 7th for a meet up to chat about the Civil Language Project?

    Dave

  • Feeling uncomfortable with “hero” @pete. I have been impressed by how difficult it is to keep my heart and month focused on unity. It is scary to be publicly voicing the Civil Language Project because it is so darn hard to follow through at times. This week has been a UGE challenge. If not for grace…

    Chris, I confess I’m not entirely sure how…[Read more]

  • The language of division tries to get enough people hostile toward enough other people so that the provocateur gains power. Too many in the political class, too many faith-based leaders and faithless skeptics, too […]

    • I think you’re a hero for spearheading this, Dave. Looking forward to seeing how it develops.

    • I second what Pete said. Love this. The world needs this. Thanks, Dave.

    • Love it. Thanks, Dave.

    • How can there not be 100 comments (1000!) excited about this. I love this idea – this direction – and the light this could shine into the world is something to get excited about! I’ve been thinking a lot this week about language being used increasingly as a weapon and how the current words being thrown around are creating false images of reality and painting all the world with a wash of despair, anger, darkness. I have so many thoughts already swirling around about this (jumbled and unformed) that it was an unexpected breeze of fresh air to find this post today.  I’m looking forward to hearing more about this!

    • Feeling uncomfortable with “hero” @pete. I have been impressed by how difficult it is to keep my heart and month focused on unity. It is scary to be publicly voicing the Civil Language Project because it is so darn hard to follow through at times. This week has been a UGE challenge. If not for grace…

      Chris, I confess I’m not entirely sure how to answer your question. It would be great to have you and others jump in and explore answers. Several thoughts come to mind. One way to view this might be to consider what comes first. Theologically, love and grace and welcoming and unifying actions always come first. With love in his eyes, God called the people he created, “very good.” There is prevenient grace; the sun rises on everyone. All are welcomed into Christ’s Kingdom. Christians always are encouraged to begin relationships with unity, and to seek reconciliation and peace when unity is challenged. Rather than beginning by defining boundaries and establishing positions, perhaps the best way to start relationships is on the common ground of our humanity and God’s loving grace.

      I have more thoughts, yet would love to encourage you and others here at Rabbit Room to jump in with yours. My sense is that the more we discuss this charitably, the more it can take shape.

    • Maybe I should say I admire the heroic effort you’re undertaking 🙂

      This is the key, right here:

      Theologically, love and grace and welcoming and unifying actions always come first. With love in his eyes, God called the people he created, “very good.” There is prevenient grace; the sun rises on everyone. All are welcomed into Christ’s Kingdom. Christians always are encouraged to begin relationships with unity, and to seek reconciliation and peace when unity is challenged. Rather than beginning by defining boundaries and establishing positions, perhaps the best way to start relationships is on the common ground of our humanity and God’s loving grace.

    • I love the discussion this is already generating.  Exciting times!

    • Dave,

      I agree wholeheartedly.  It is wonderful that the Rabbit Room has been a leader in this movement.  This community teaches me the art of artful conversation.

      Cheers!

      Tony

  • David Michael Bruno started the topic in the forum 4 years, 6 months ago

    Thinking back to @pete The Art of Gracious Discussion thread + reacting to the latest news of injustice mixed with incivility online + feeling a touch hopeless about national leadership + being a bit hopeful nevertheless, I have a thought. Let me get to it…

    In this rather long and completely inspiring message delivered by David Brooks to…[Read more]

  • David Michael Bruno changed their profile picture 4 years, 6 months ago

  • “Truth in the inward parts leads to truth in the fingers.” I want a motivational poster made with those words! Thanks, Ron. This is such a great reminder.

  • So glad this is resonating with others! Also, I like how we’re thinking about this beyond waiting in literal lines. @jannabarber for about six years we lived without a microwave. It was lovely. We finally replaced our broken above-the-stove microwave and it just isn’t as enjoyable or delicious to reheat food. But I use it. Which affirms a truth: I…[Read more]

  • The new marketing tagline at Chick-fil-A read, “Lines are so last year.” It promoted Chick-fil-A One, which allows chicken-eaters to earn loyalty points to acquire free poultry. Also, in-app purchases allow cus […]

    • I think you’re on to something here @davebruno

    • Amen and thank you!

    • Excellent. And Amen.

    • Lines = a nearness to humanity. It’s hard to explain why I’ve been avoiding the new online or kiosk ordering in favor of a short exchange with an actual person. It seems that we don’t know how to wait in line anymore. But it’s an opportunity to take a deep breath and look around.

    • For goodness’ sake. This was hilarious.

      Also, i think you’re onto something. Also also, i want to hear about your thought experiment.

      Also also also, i read a book a few years ago: The Line, by Olga Grushin. So good. So much humanness (glory and fallenness) was developed and revealed in that line.

    • Well, without lines it would certainly make my own personal anthropology more difficult. I would lose a ton of my people-watching time.  I also think the experience of delayed gratification is rather important for us in small doses, or the times when it isn’t something small like a sandwich (illness for instance) can become overwhelming to our coping skills.  Sometimes we need practice to learn to anticipate something, but wait patiently.

    • I hope you’re mostly preaching to the choir, here. After all, this is the website that gave birth to Hutchmoot, which is made up of lots of waiting moments, and that’s where much of the magic happens. What we’ve been reading in The Slow Church forum goes quite well with all of this, too. God’s sense of time can feel very slow if we never have to practice that in real life. The concrete example I come up with for myself today was putting a piece of pizza in the microwave to warm it up, or turning on the stove. Sure the stove takes way more time, but you’re never going to get anything crispy in a microwave.

    • I am pretty sure I read an article or saw an article about this concept recently but it beats me where.

      I think there is a corollary in Amazon Prime. Being able to order some thing and have is show up on my doorstep in three days for no extra fee is great! …but I’ve noticed it’s far less satisfying than planning an order (waiting until I have enough to hit free shipping) and then waiting for it to arrive. It’s like robbing myself of a little bit of Christmas.

    • So glad this is resonating with others! Also, I like how we’re thinking about this beyond waiting in literal lines. @jannabarber for about six years we lived without a microwave. It was lovely. We finally replaced our broken above-the-stove microwave and it just isn’t as enjoyable or delicious to reheat food. But I use it. Which affirms a truth: I naturally gravitate towards convenience. Which confirms why Chic-fil-A and other firms can entice me with convenience.

    • Now that you mention it, David, I have had mixed emotions about fixing the dishwasher yesterday. It definitely is much easier on a busy household but there is something about hand-washing each meal and having it done that is fulfilling and I kind of enjoyed the last couple weeks.

      I also didn’t mean my previous comment to sound dismissive – didn’t fully self-edit there, sorry. The concept does resonate and connects to other things I’ve read so I am having serious deja-vu and it’s really bugging me.

      @wonderseeker – didn’t grok your comment about Google last night but my wife and I were talking about that very thing a few weeks ago. It may have  been because of the five different (large) dictionaries I have on the shelf collecting dust. I think the tools are a boon – my challenge is using it purposefully rather than impulsively or habitually. Sometimes that means writing down things to look up later instead of doing it right away.

      Also, um, we have a toaster oven that is perfect for re-heating pizza slices and only takes a couple minutes to crisp.  😛

    • Whenever we go to the amusement park nearest us, my brothers and I always gravitate toward the roller coasters… The big ones, that everybody likes.  The ones with the really long lines. (Of course, we usually do try and go when most people are in school, but still).  I’ve found that, whether my brothers are with me or not, it’s a great time for people-watching and letting my mind wander. Smiling at the little kids and their parents in front of you, trying not to eavesdrop on  the rednecks behind you… Where would we be without it?

    • This article on transhumanism seems really relevant here.

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