• The first TED talk I remember ever watching was “Your Elusive Creative Genius,” by Elizabeth Gilbert, in 2009. If you aren’t among the 19 million people (literally) who have watched this talk, or if you just […]

  • In An Experiment in Criticism, C. S. Lewis puts a finger on one of the things I love so much about Tolkien, though Lewis is not specifically talking about his good friend Tolkien’s stories. In the chapter “On […]

  • While reading Wendell Berry’s story collection, That Distant Land, I was struck by this description of a character named Martha Elizabeth Coulter:

    She was a woman always near to smiling, sometimes to […]

    • I think, Jonathan, that we have much to learn from your Wilderking Trilogy main character, Aidan Errolson.
      When Aidan encountered Dobro, the first Feechie he had ever beheld, he did not spurn him but instead embraced him.
      In due course of time, Aidan embraced Feechiedom in all its ‘weirdness’ and ‘other-ness.’
      Meanwhile, the vast majority of Aidan’s ‘kind’ harboured fear in their hearts towards the Feechies, if not outright disbelief in their existence.
      In their brittle, narrow minds, there was only room for caricatures of Feechiedom.
      Only Aidan understood that “It is good that each of God’s creatures exists.”
      And the entire story pivots on his singular comprehension of this fact.
      A message for us all.
      Contemplatively,
      PhiL >^•_•^<

    • Thank you for this. I just closed the window from facebook where I was rather discouraged because the feed had been cluttered with violence about just about anything imaginable…not just people yelling about it, actual violence. The last paragraph “This world exists because God thinks it is a good idea. To love the world and our fellow creatures is simply to say that God’s not wrong.” was such a needed counterpoint. It is hard to believe sometimes, but that is what we are called to. And God does know what He is doing, thank you for the reminders that this world is truly full of good, but realized now and yet to be revealed.

  • So glad you and The Resistance are back, Matt. Long live The Resistance!

  • Twelve years ago this month, Waterbrook Press released On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness, Book 1 of Andrew Peterson’s Wingfeather Saga. I counted it a privilege to be allowed to write the Rabbit Room’s rel […]

  • One day I needed a fondue pot. A fondue pot is not something one wants to buy. I have lived over 18,000 days now, and on exactly ONE of those days have I wished I had a fondue pot. But the day in question was […]

    • I don’t know what the explanatory subtitle would be, but I think there’s an empty space in this world that might only be filled by a book of your principles and theorems: The Fondue Pot Principle, Other People’s Rodents, etc.

  • Speaking of The Hobbit, J. R. R. Tolkien wrote. . .

     it grows like a seed in the dark out of the leaf-mould of the mind: out of all that has been seen or thought or read, that has long been forgotten, […]

  • Yes! The Faerie Queene is one of my all-time favorites. I’m mighty glad you’re doing this. And transposition…I’m so glad you hit on that word instead of “translation.” I was worried about that.

  • Wow and yes and amen. Thank you, Drew, for wrestling these ideas down and putting them into words. I need to print out this essay and frame it and put it on my desk. Or put it on a t-shirt. Or maybe I’ll take up cross-stitching. Your essay put me in mind of this passage from Robert Farrar Capon’s Supper of the Lamb:
    “The world may or may not n…[Read more]

  • Helena, thank you for this.

  • I’m proud of you, Janna. Keep on trucking.

  • A cynic remarked that last week’s fire at Notre Dame has turned out to be an excellent excuse for social media users to post pictures of their vacations in Paris. A less cynical interpretation is that the fire a […]

    • My stepson (a young preacher) and I were talking the other night about how the work we do can seem insignificant. As a longtime writer, I understand that feeling every time I hit “publish” on a blog post. I said, what if, at the end of everything, God gathers up all of our good words and sermons and songs and service, and builds something new? So I was thrilled to see your insightful post and this stunning analogy of “where the work fits in the big picture.” Thank you, Jonathan!

    • “What work is in front of you today? Show up. Do the work. The harvest will take care of itself.” These are such encouraging words! You’ve addressed two of the deepest fears I face every time I try to start a new project. So often I find myself hindered by my own perfectionism, knowing that the finished product will never be as beautiful in real life as the perfect vision I saw in my head. It can be so difficult to find the motivation to push through that fear, especially when the real “worth” of art is something that can’t be seen or measured in practical terms. But that’s where faith comes into play. It’s not my job to worry about outcome; my job is to listen and obey. God gives the increase. Thank you for this!

  • I love this, Becca! I want to hear more about this farm life. I hope you’ll keep us posted.

  • Writing is the act of sitting alone and trying to connect with other people, some of whom may not even be born yet.

    By necessity, writing is a solitary enterprise. When it comes time to put words on a page you […]

    • i have been terribly excited for this ever since i first heard about it. My thirteen-year-old self (if i can still call her that; the jury is out) and i are going to use these resources for at least her first year of high school. Nailed that plan down a month and a half into 8th grade. We are currently learning parts of speech just so that we can be conversant when we start Grammar for Writers. XD

    • Love the close up on the main page! Jonathan Rogers stars in “The Shining (Light of the World)!” Joel Siegel raves, “An upbeat Christian remake of the Kubrick classic!” Okay, I’m done.

  • In a recent episode of the Radiolab podcast, producer Latif Nasser shares some of his techniques for finding stories to research and write about. The episode grows from this article, in which Nasser offers even […]

    • sorry about the mistakes. I was rushing.

    • Wonderful post, Jonathan. I’m eager to read Nasser’s article as well. Talking to strangers has been something my grown children and I have enjoyed for years. In fact, my youngest (as a ministry too) hosts weekly “teas” in her apartment for elderly women who live in the same building. Probably one of the most interesting conversations my middle daughter and I had was with a man cycling on the less traveled trail we were hiking in the woods. My daughter and I had stopped to take photos of a huge and unusually-shaped tree. Seeing us, the man hopped off his bike to tell us the tree was a vortex (could we sense that too?) and that as soon as his time machine arrived (via mail order), he was going to try it out beside the tree. We never did see him again. 🙂 Of course I had to blog about the encounter, which left me the richer for the story I get to tell now and the other stories my mind started to weave as I imagined where and when and why this man might go.

    • Wonderful post, Jonathan. I’m eager to read Nasser’s article as well. Talking to strangers has been something my grown children and I have enjoyed for years. In fact, my youngest (as a ministry too) hosts weekly “teas” in her apartment for elderly women who live in the same building. Probably one of the most interesting conversations my middle daughter and I had was with a man cycling on the less traveled trail we were hiking in the woods. My daughter and I had stopped to take photos of a huge and unusually-shaped tree. Seeing us the man hopped off his bike to tell us the tree was a vortex (could we sense that too) and that as soon as his time machine arrived (via mail order), he was going to try it out beside the tree. We never did see him again. 🙂 Of course I had to blog about the encounter, which left me the richer for the story I get to tell now and the other stories my mind started to weave as I imagined where and when and why this man might go.

  • In “School of Rock,” an exceedingly lazy and self-indulgent Dewey Finn announces (from his bed), “I serve society by rocking.” But Springsteen has convinced my that he actually does serve society by rocking. And you, Jennifer, serve society by writing brilliant and insightful things. Thanks so much for this. I haven’t yet seen the Mary Poppins…[Read more]

  • No, Hunter, I never did. Or, I suppose I should say, I haven’t yet. One doesn’t recover quickly from an experience like that.

  • I love this, Doug. Thanks for putting it into the world.

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