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    • Tiese Morgan
      Participant
      @releve2k

      In chapter 8:

      “I found cheerfulness to be like life itself – not to be created by any argument.”

      I find this statement to both ring true, and to be confusing. Does anyone have insight as to what it means?

      Also in chapter 8:

      “Afterwards I learned, that the best way to manage some kinds of painful thoughts, is to dare them to do their worst, to let them lie and gnaw at your heart till they are tired, and you find you still have a residue of life they cannot kill. So, better and worse, I went on.”

      Oh my! This statement is powerful to me. Don’t try to escape the grief that will come my way. Dare it to do it’s worst. Trust in the Life that will remain on the other side. Only a person who who has gone through an extremely difficult situation could write such a statement. This will be something that will stay with me for a long time.

      On a different note. As someone who can never remember the usage-of-comma rules, it seems the GM uses commas as much as I would like to use commas…I received so many red circles around my commas on my papers.


    • Tiese Morgan
      Participant
      @releve2k

      I was stopped in my tracts by the farm woman’s description of the Maid of the Alder-tree in chapter 7.

      “a self destructive beauty, though; for it is that which is constantly wearing her away within, till, at last, the decay will reach her face, and her whole front, when all the lovely mask of nothing will fall to pieces”

      Such an accurate picture of vanity, and selfish love. It is a potent inspiration to run from such a temptation.

    • I was raised in a rather non-traditional family. I have come up with the term “Hippie-Hick” to describe my family’s culture. Education, regular church attendance, or exploration of historical art in any form was not valued. Though I came to know Jesus 30 years ago, I have to admit that I have often sneered at spending much time exploring the classics (besides the Bible of course). This reading group has introduced me to the incredibly vast and rich, Christ inspired literary history that was unknown to me previously. It is as if another set of scales have fallen from my eyes. I find myself hungry for our traditional roots, and am only troubled with where to begin. Thank you for the thought, time, and effort that was needed for this project. My brain feels pushed to it’s limits, my creativity is freshly inspired, and my spirit is well fed.

    • Death as Birth
      O ignorant poor man! what doth thou bear
      Locked up within the casket of thy breast?
      What jewels, and what riches hast thou there!
      What heavenly treasure in so weak a chest!

      I am pretty good at making jokes at my expense. It is an attempt to express humility, and believe me there is a lot of material. But these verses challenge me give more attention and honor to not only the presence of the Holy Spirit that lives in me (a treasure indeed), but also to the gifts and talents that God has given me. Yes, the chest is weak, but the treasures are Devine.

    • I am not sure where to post this, but I just wanted to say somewhere that my brain is so full right now. I just finished watching the two Zoom talks about Dante, and I can’t believe that I have actually decided to find copies of La Comidia books to read the whole thing for myself. I always thought that it was for folks much smarter and more educated than I. Thank you for the inspiration and encouragement to give it a go.


    • Tiese Morgan
      Participant
      @releve2k

      I was out on a trail run this week and I saw an ugly, leafless tree standing next to a beautifully blooming cherry blossom tree. The blossoming tree was a reminder that the leafless tree would soon be full and beautiful as well. It made me consider the ugly times we are in right now. I can only see barren branches, but God is at work in secret places. He will, in His time, reveal the beauty of these days.


    • Tiese Morgan
      Participant
      @releve2k

      That was very helpful. I see that a better word for “rules” is “tools”. Malcolm’s explanation has not only given me a spark of inspiration to write my own poetry (and maybe share it), but it has also given me more insight into the poems that we are reading. Thank you. This experience is such a blessing.


    • Tiese Morgan
      Participant
      @releve2k

      This is my first stab at reading poetry with intention. I do not have any education in reading or writing poetry. This has been an expanding experience so far, thank you.

      One of the prompts this week is to write a listing poem in response to the poems we have been reading this week. It seems that I have heard that there are rules that need to be followed when writing different types of poems, so I am feeling inadequate for the task of writing my own poem, let alone sharing it with others. My question is; is it possible/usual/acceptable to write poetry without following any rules?

      P.S. my name is pronounced Ty-ees in case you are wanting to use this question


    • Tiese Morgan
      Participant
      @releve2k

      I agree with your thought regarding the cheerfulness section of the quote. That is absolutely how it rings true to me. I am confused by what he means when he says that life cannot be created by argument. A lot of things cannot be created by argument, why does he specifically indicate “life itself”?

      I hadn’t thought about the fact that the psychology concepts that I take for granted were not around in 1858. Amazing!

      Do you suppose that GM uses a lot of commas because his work is more like poetry than any other style?


    • Tiese Morgan
      Participant
      @releve2k

      This is also my first read, and though there were hints to make me suspicious (Anodos experienced a negative feeling when he got close to her and looked into her eyes, she wouldn’t look at him or let him get close after that, and there was a hint of color in her eyes) I didn’t know if those hints were meant to warn me or intrigue me.

      After the revelation of the deception by the Maid of the Alder, it dawned on me that Anodos started this journey off as kind of a blank slate (much like I did as a youth). He was full of good intentions, but did not have wisdom that only comes through experience – often negative experience. The devouring greed of the Ash, the selfish love of the Alder, and the negative result caused by the Shadow is giving Anodos a crash course in “being as wise as a serpent”.

      However, he still felt that beautiful moment of spontaneous love when he sang over the Lady in the Marble (I loved this moment. It reminded me of the idea that God sings over us in our own tomb). I am hoping/expecting that this memory will inspire him to seek for the “better way”.

      That is my take on the sequence of events. What do you think?


    • Tiese Morgan
      Participant
      @releve2k

      Jenni, That is exactly how that passage spoke to me as well. I was not brave enough to admit in my post how much it convicted me. I know that I have behaved in such a way in the past, and I even now will struggle with a lingering temptation. The description of the Maid of the Alder exposes the lie that says achieving such admiration will bring satisfaction and a sense of worth. I now have a very clear picture of just how ugly and destructive this mindset is, and a powerful tool to use against it. Thank you for your honesty.


    • Tiese Morgan
      Participant
      @releve2k

      Thank you Jennifer. That was a good watch.


    • Tiese Morgan
      Participant
      @releve2k

      Have the recordings been posted and I am just not finding them? If so, where do I go to access them? Thank you for organizing this.

      Tiese


    • Tiese Morgan
      Participant
      @releve2k

      Thank you


    • Tiese Morgan
      Participant
      @releve2k

      David,

      How do you subscribe to the Zoom Session Recordings?

      Oh, never mind. That is what this forum thread is titled (couldn’t figure out how to delete the original question :).

      Tiese

    • I am new to poetry so I may be completely off, but I got the understanding that my soul is His the first time because He made my soul (but thou which didst man’s soul of nothing make), and my soul is His the second time because of His payment for my fallen soul through His sacrifice (And God with God, becam’st a Man with men.)

    • I would be interested to hear him speak to this as well.


    • Tiese Morgan
      Participant
      @releve2k

      I felt like I was in your home with you, you described it so well. Beautiful.


    • Tiese Morgan
      Participant
      @releve2k

      “What can I give them, poor as I am?
      Give what you have been given, you are a steward of the Lamb”

      As a teacher, I think these lines will be repeated in my thoughts often.


    • Tiese Morgan
      Participant
      @releve2k

      Thank you. I was struggling with this poem, and your insight just helped put some of the pieces together for me.

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